Author Topic: Old dogs behavior  (Read 368 times)

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Offline Summer

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Old dogs behavior
« on: September 18, 2017, 10:11:16 PM »
I am worried about my pet dog. He will be 14 years old in November but he is a very energetic dog but now he is sleeping almost all the time and has very little energy anymore. He is starting to pee on the walls in my home and on my bean bag (which I can replace) and on my sofa.  The older he gets the more clingy with me he gets and follows me everywhere. He never used to do that.  Him Constantly sleeping is really  worrying me. It's as if he isn't him anymore. It's especially worrying me since that he is showing the same signs my other dog that my mom and I had to put down a few months ago. he had been constantly sleeping,wanting to have Constant Contact with me and my mom having accidents all over my home (he never used to do that) almost no energy. I'm having trouble keeping him interested in playtime and training even just chasing after other animals in my backyard  (he loved doing that) He barely ever wags his tail anymore. He is usually a very happy dog and would wag his tail at almost anything.he is acting depressed.

A friend suggested posting this on here.   

Both me and my mom is stubborn and if I try talking to her about it it will upset her and possibly cause an huge argument.
Talking about my dogs health is VERY upsetting for her and I do not want that. It hasn't even been a year since my other dog was put down I can't even talk about him with her.

I do not know what to do.... please help if you can.  I am open to suggestions.
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Offline missythewriter

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #1 on: September 18, 2017, 10:18:18 PM »
Does he seem to be in any pain or discomfort? Or is he just slowing down? It's natural for dogs, when they reach old age, to slow down and not be as excitable about things that once excited them. He's more tired, because he's reaching the end of his life. But if he's in pain, or you think he is, I'd suggest you take him to a vet and get him some pain medication. If you think he needs to be put down, but your mom isn't willing to do that, you can at least let him live out the rest of his life with medication that will help with joint/body pain, if he's experiencing it. As for the urinating in the house, I'd suggest either setting pads on your floors, or giving him dog diapers.

In any case, you pamper that dog like crazy. Make sure he's super comfortable. Give him the yummiest treats ever. Maybe even sneak him some super special human food once in a while. Old dogs are so sweet, and deserve the best. :smile:

Offline Summer

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #2 on: September 18, 2017, 11:20:33 PM »
He doesn't seem to be in any pain.   Also my mom pays the vet bills. He is a small dog he is a Rat terrier Maltese mix and  He is a healthy dog but I still worry that he is sleeping almost all the time and acting depressed. 

Could it be possible that he is just depressed about his brother being gone? 

Heither is still eating and drinking and the vet said his weight is perfect 15 pounds.

We do have wee-wee pads in the Den and living room and he uses them.  But he still has been peeing on the walls and sofa.  I moved my bean bag.     

I let him outside at least 4 times a day he was never taught to let me know when he has to go. 

Him and his brother was me and my mom first dogs.


I also worry that when it is his time to go I wil start having terrible panic attacks and depression.  I ALWAYS make sure I'm with them till the end no matter what. 


I know that I will start having problems mentally (Panic attacks, depression, anxiety and stress)  but In my heart  I know I could never let them die by them selves so I prepare myself when I feel it's time.   
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Offline Arrowcom

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #3 on: September 19, 2017, 12:07:31 AM »
  Putting an old dog down is never easy, and I really do sympathies with you. Last March I had to put my Bichon down. He was 16. He was having accidents in the house too, but unlike your pup, he wasn't walking at all on a leash, and he was very stiff and sour. He was also suffering from seizures and was losing a lot of weight, and in the end he refused to eat. That's how we knew for sure it was time. Just make sure your little guy is healthy and happy. The fact that he is getting older means he is a very lucky dog who got to live out some amazing years with you. Not a lot of dogs have humans who treat them so well and are looking out for their best interest like you are. Just keep an eye on him, make sure he is eating and not in pain, and enjoy every day with him. And if you ever need to talk to people about your other dog or this little guy, we're always here. I think talking really does help. I couldn't talk about my dog for a few weeks either but the more I started talking, the better I felt.

I'll be thinking about you guys. :smile:
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Offline Summer

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #4 on: September 19, 2017, 12:31:04 AM »
Yes he is very loved cared for and of course spoiled.

My other dog that is gone now had been having very similar health issues he was a Chihuahua Shih Tzu mix. He had stopped eating dry so we gave him Caesar wet dog food the vet said he was losing lots of weight so they said to keep giving him the Caesar wet food but instead of adult gave puppy. He was losing so much weight we could see and feel his bones (spine,  ribs and his hip bones)  no matter what we did he would just not gain weight. We even gave him his favorite cooked chicken. He was certain kinds of medicine.

Then we took him to the vet and they said it would be best to put him down.  They said if they treated his kidneys his heart would fail if they treated his heart his kidneys fail so the best thing to do for him is to put him down.

His name was Copper. Like from the Fox and the hound.  He was my mom's dog but she couldn't be in the room when it happens so I help him before during and after.  I promised him id would be there till the very end. I will do that with any and all my animalstuff.

My mom has his collar and paw print and I have his ashes along with my first cats.


Thank you for any and all help. And thank you for your support.   
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Offline Summertime.and.Azkaban

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #5 on: September 19, 2017, 01:49:24 AM »
If he's just having wee accidents I'd get him a belly band. Much less restrictive and cumbersome than a full diaper.

We have a GSD mix who is anywhere from 10-12. We got him two or three years ago, he was a lot livelier then. He actually has two tumors on the underside of his tail, we're not sure if they're begin or cancerous but since they're not changing in size, shape or harness our vet decided to leave it alone.

He has arthritis and very bad allergies. We wash him frequently in human psoriasis shampoo and he's on pain medication and antihistamines. He still likes to gallop and can be energetic at times, but he's clingy too.

Adopting a senior dog was a difficult decision for my SO and I'm proud that he's faced and came to terms with the fact that his dog is reaching end of life. Chewy enjoys luxuries the other dogs don't have and gets away with a lot. He's a lot more grey in the face than when we bought him home but he's come to love us, and trust us which took a lot of time.

Providing end of life care for elderly dogs is painful but rewarding. Chewy sleeps a lot as well, he's just an old man who wants to nap. 

Let your dog sleep on your lap, buy him a belly band and make him as comfortable as you can. End of life doesn't mean immediate death, just that he needs some special considerations and comforts.

If he's anxious when you're not around a thunder shirt might help him. I've also heard from others that thundershirts and other compression garments can help with general eldery dog aches, as they act like a full body compression sock.
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Offline Summer

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #6 on: September 19, 2017, 04:31:10 AM »
He was never taught to let somebody know he needs to go outside. We do put wee-week pads in places he knows it's okay. I don't think he needs diapers or anything like that yet if at all.  But my concern is why he is starting to pee in places he never goes on and that he knows nothat to do.   

Thinking about it now I'm starting to wonder if maybe he is bord and wants to start doing things to do like learning tricks. He used to enjoy learning some new things.

But I will still keep an eye on his health.
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #7 on: September 19, 2017, 12:45:32 PM »
Your dog is old and if he hasn't yet had a geriatric work up, maybe you should consider it.  Note:  these usually cost more than a regular exam because tests are required.  BUT you can do it with a healthy dog which might make it make sense to your mom.  If cost is an issue, maybe you can just present it as a physical exam without bloodwork.  Just to check over his eyes, lungs and heart.

A dog with decreased vision, very common in elderly dogs, can get clingier.  They can't see as well and this is unsettling, they cling to feel safe.  They trust you to see for them and to protect them.  The same may be true with decreased hearing.

Dogs with decreased stamina can be having a problem with heart or lungs.  Or it could just be old age slowing them down.  I would, if he were my dog, want at a minimum to have a vet take a listen to his heart and lungs and feel his internal organs, just to rule out obvious cancer tumors.  You can't completely rule out cancer that way but if a previously active older dog suddenly becomes fatigued I think hemangiosarcoma because that's what happened to both Cole and Luna.

For toileting issues at his age, I suggest a male incontenence garment, sometimes called a belly band.  It's a wide belt that you can line with a maxi-pad or diaper to absorb the urine when he pees before it hits the furniture or carpet.  I don't think there's much point in trying to retrain a dog that was reliable in the past and now is elderly and not so reliable.  It could be that his bladder is getting less elastic and he just needs to go more often than he used to.  It could also be that there's a health problem (which is why I highly recommend a vet visit).
« Last Edit: September 19, 2017, 12:48:05 PM by Kirsten »
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Offline Summer

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #8 on: September 19, 2017, 05:31:07 PM »
I will try talking to my mom about getting Balto (my dog)  to the vet for a check-up like you Kristen have suggested.
But I highly doubt my mom would take Balto to the vet if she believes there is nothing serious wrong with him. Plus my mom is low on money right now so she most likely won't bring him in for a check-up and I am bad at explaining things to people but if anybody has suggestions on how to explain it to my mom please say.

If I where to say I think it's best for Balto's health to get him to the vet for a check-up she would answer with "No I am not taking Balto to the vet just for a check-up if there is nothing serious wrong with him. Plus I cannot afford the vet bills when he seems fine to me."

MY mom is a teacher so she doesn't see Balto much so she wouldn't be the first to notice anything.  I would be the first to notice even the slightest thing.  I am very in tune with my dog most of the time.


I also feel that since  she is very attached to Balto that when something is wrong with him she will go into denial about it.  She was the same way as my other dog we had to recently put down.


I do appreciate the suggestionsupport of diapers and belly band but that is something that I'm not willing to use unless he starts to show more signs of bladder control issues. The number one reason is because my mom would not allow me to use or purchase them.

And since I live with my mom and we share Balto so I have to respect her wishes too. Even if I disagree with her. We would have to both be okay with most of things.

But if Balto was in pain or/and suffering or anything close to it and I told her she would ask me to show her what's going on with him she would take him to the vet immediately.

If the vet says the best thing to do is put him on medication or put him down she would do it if that's what's best.
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Offline Moonsong

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Re: Old dogs behavior
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2017, 06:18:45 PM »
I have a suggestion for approaching your mom.

Try to avoid the word 'check up'. I wouldn't talk about it like it was a general health kind of thing. If I were in your position, I would say something to her along the lines of:

"Hey, Mom. I'm worried about Balto. He's started losing energy, being clingy and peeing in places he normally knows better than to pee on. I mean, it might just be that he's slowing down and losing bladder control, but what if it isn't?

There's a test that vets can perform on senior dogs. They examine their heart, lungs, eyes, etc. I know that you might not want to spend the money when Balto's seems to generally be fine, but hear me out. If they do this test and find something wrong, then we can fix it before it turns into something bad and hurts him. So either we find something and fix it before it hurts him, or we at the very least know for sure that he's just getting older and there isn't cause for concern. It'd save us a lot of worry, either way.

I know that you don't even want to consider that he might have something wrong with him, but isn't it better to know about it and make it better before it's too late than to not know about it and then it's too late? And I know that you're concerned about wasting money, but again - is saving the money from a vet trip worth the risk that there may be something there that we don't know about?"


I don't know - that was an extremely rough draft off of the top of my sleepy head, so it's probably not all that great. But something along those lines.


The idea that I'm suggesting, basically, is to REALLY emphasis preventative care. Performing this test might potentially extend Balto's life and comfort. And if not, at least you can rest easy knowing that he's still perfectly healthy; just old.
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