Author Topic: adopt or buy?  (Read 876 times)

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Offline Ariel

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #30 on: October 06, 2017, 04:49:15 PM »
Also, what about dogs whose body language is impaired? Those with cropped ears or tails who can't express their emotions as effectively?

While we're dispelling rumors, Iíve heard this several time before and I think it's important to point this out as being one of those stupid things that get passed around on the Internet and people believe it because they donít know better. Of course dogs can read body language of other dogs with cropped ears, docked tails, amputations, removed or deformed eyes, etc.  Body language is far more complex than a single body part not looking like the norm. Of course a Border Collie tail looks different from a Labrador tail, look different from a Malamute tail, looks different from a Pug tail, looks different than a Whippet tail. Body language is the sum of all of the body parts creating the behavior of the dog. Dogs are reading other dog behaviors,  not looking at one specific piece of a dog that doesnít look just like them.
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Offline SandyStern

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #31 on: October 06, 2017, 07:57:05 PM »
I do think that dogs of different breeds have trouble understanding each other as well.  My dog never reacts to GSDs or dogs that have similar body types. But bully breeds with their flat faces, Shiba Inus with curly tails, those are harder for him to read, and he looks at them longer. If they stare back, he doesn't like to turn his back on them.  I think it must be like talking to someone with a thick accent, struggling with English.  We can understand them, but nuance is more difficult and misunderstandings happen. 

Offline Summertime.and.Azkaban

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #32 on: October 06, 2017, 08:29:55 PM »
I think we often presume that because we rely heavily on the tail and ears to communicate non-verbally with dogs that dogs also rely heavily on the ears and tail to communicate with each other.

Body language is in posture than anything in my opinion. Height of head, gait, and method of movement. I think that posturing is extremely important in dog communication, moreso than ear or tail position.

I'm not fond of docking and cropping unless there's a functional explanation, like dogs who travel extensively in underbrush or herd. Dogs who have docked tails don't struggle to communicate with peers in my opinion. 

A tail is not necessarily a clear indication of inflection. Dogs who are aroused even in a possibly aggressive manner can wag their tails.

Dogs have more of whatever structure it is in the eye that detects movement. Rods or cones, we have more of the color ones and they have more movement ones. It's easy to detect expressions made by a dog without ears to the human eye. Eyes tighten or become lax, mouth is taught or relaxed, tongue is lolling about or held in an arch.

Muscles that control the ears still function when the ears are cropped. They still change the expression in the face.
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #33 on: October 06, 2017, 08:43:35 PM »
Cones and color both start with "c," which is how I remember it is cones that detect color.  Rods detect black and white which is useful in low light conditions (twilight) and in motion detection.

I think it would be uncommon to dock a herding dog for function as they use the tail for balance on sharp turns.  Like cats.  Docking in Aussies and Pembrook corgis is aesthetic rather than functional because some are born without tails or with partial tails and some Aussies with even full tails.  With other breeds that typically have full tails, like German shepherds, the four Belgians, rough, smooth and border collies, and cardigan corgis, the tails are left long and they are used.  If docking were functional for herding dogs, it would happen at least some of the time in all of the herding breeds, wouldn't it, instead of always docking in some breeds and never docking in others that perform the same or similar job?

Somewhere I've got a photo of Ruby taking a corner so tight she's at about a 50 degree angle and you can see how she's using her long neck and tail to balance on that tight turn.
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Offline Suse

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #34 on: October 06, 2017, 09:12:51 PM »
??   Someone said 'trained Emotional Support Dogs'.   I am trying not to laugh.  They require no training to be an ESA.  I have yet to see one well trained.

Offline Kirsten

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #35 on: October 06, 2017, 10:49:33 PM »
They (emotional support dogs) do have to have SOME training.  They need to be house trained and civilized enough to be under control and not disturbing neighbors.

A lot of them are a lot more trained than that.

Please try to be sensitive to the fact that this forum is for people with emotional support animals too and it's not okay to disparage them.
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Offline Ashany

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #36 on: October 06, 2017, 11:49:28 PM »
I was going to say, a young man at the same company I work for has an ESA. His dog is very well trained and does an amazing job of keeping his owner upbeat. Not to mention the dog is very well trained. I think there might be certain misconceptions about ESA's.

Offline Suse

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Re: adopt or buy?
« Reply #37 on: October 07, 2017, 08:07:23 PM »
Yup, I should have been more sensitive. Unfortunately recently have had to hear about and deal with complaints about totally untrained ESA's in rental units and in the university dorms.   I am sure many people train them, but many do not as well. Also recently saw one at an airport peeing on the plants and pulling and barking all over.