Author Topic: Older service dog issues  (Read 553 times)

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Offline responsiblek9

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Older service dog issues
« on: July 05, 2017, 09:56:21 AM »
Well one of my client's older service dog ( age 9) has been having some small issues with low light situations. Is not used at night since she is not out and about then. But she was noticing small things in evening light.  I had advised her to get the dog's eyes checked by the eye vets.

I have been testing all my young breeding and working stock for inherited issues with Embark and GenSol. Decided maybe to test him with a single point Gensol test for PRA. So called her and asked if she was interested and  I was shocked to find how much the eye vets were asking for an eye exam. DNA test is only 40$. She was thrilled I was getting that for her.

Well the eye vets had told her that screening would be $150. For now she had to decline that. But this if he has it would at least tell us if he has a common issues that can crop up in her breed.
Interesting.

Takes a week to get results with GenSol.
A thousand miles you walked with me ,
 Through the fields and streams
  Down many a lonely place, On darkened  paths and streets

Offline EverConfused

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2017, 10:12:50 AM »
i'm confused.

doesn't the dog still need to go to the vet for an eye exam anyway? or is this test the same one the vet was going to do, but for a lower price?

i don't know anything about how vet care pricing works. i'm trying to understand.
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2017, 10:58:35 AM »
The genetic test will tell you whether the dog has the genetic potential, but not whether the dog absolutely will express that potential.  So in my case I'm pretty darned sure Luna had DM (not confirmed by necropsy, but her vet agreed with me based on symptoms).  Does Ruby have it?  I can get her tested for the gene and if she's heterozygous for it (one good gene, one bad) then she won't develop that disorder for certain.  If she's homozygous (two bad genes) then she is at risk of developing it.

If you know your breed is prone to a specific genetic condition, genetic screening may be a more cost effective way to eliminate that item from the list of things to worry about.  It won't be cost effective for looking for all possible causes, but if you're thinking X is a big likelihood based on breed history or family history and you test and can eliminate it then you can return for further testing by the vet and you're out $40 BUT if it comes back negative, you know for certain it cannot be what you suspected.

So in Ruby's case, I have strong suspicions that both her mother and uncle had the condition.  It is a known genetic condition in her breed.  It is a horrible way to die.  I discussed genetic screening with her vet ($60) but we decided against it because it wouldn't change how we're treating her now.  She has no symptoms.  And since both of her parents died of hemangio, I'm thinking that is going to take her out pretty quickly on top of her bleeding disorder.  She's losing weight, but is otherwise in better shape than either of her parents were at this age (her 12th birthday is Tuesday).

In Tardis's case, his mother was screened for DM before he was born and we know she cannot produce puppies with this disorder.  She could produce carriers if bred to a male with the gene, but none that experience the disease.  What a relief to know Tardis will never have to face this.  And since I got him to be a service dog not a breeding dog and he hasn't and will never produce puppies, I don't care if he's a carrier since it won't affect him.

Cole, Luna and Ruby all developed cataracts in old age which covered the entire eye and affected vision.  Ruby is having some difficulty seeing her ball unless it is close (within 6 feet) or in motion.  But she still runs and plays like a young dog.  So I'm looking into getting her a high visibility (bright yellow) version of her favorite ball.
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest

Offline EverConfused

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2017, 12:30:28 PM »
i think i get it now. so the genetic test (plus breed knowledge) functions as a screening? i.e. a lower cost, possibly less invasive way of figuring out if the dog needs the gold standard testing for a given condition?

i see now that that's exactly what responsiblek9 wrote. i don't really have any explanation for why i didn't understand before other than a brain vacation.  :laugh:

i guess maybe it's also that i didn't realize genetic testing could be more a more cost effective starting place than an eye exam. i know that genetic testing for animals, especially dogs, is relatively cheap and accessible. i just didn't quite realize the extent of it, i think. (i'm pretty sure in people you basically always start with the eye exam or brain imaging before you get to genetic testing. i was def stuck in the human health framework, which is very different.)
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2017, 02:49:50 PM »
Responsiblek9 often speaks in a shorthand. She also hasn't been active here for a while, so you may not know her well.  I've known her since before SDC existed (more than a decade), so I had a head start on understanding what she was saying.

She's a bad speller and lazy on grammar but is actually very bright and knowledgeable, a trainer with several decades of experience, an experienced breeder, a follower and collector of news stories and laws of interest to the disabled, a fabulous resource.  Key areas of expertise:  training guide, seizure, mobility, hearing, and autism dogs, as well as hunting dogs.  We kinda lost her to the black hole that is facebook, but she still peeks in from time to time.  :wink:
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest

Offline EverConfused

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2017, 04:54:13 PM »
Quote
She's a bad speller and lazy on grammar

responsiblek9, you're my kind of people.  :biggrin:

as a kid, i was diagnosed with "stress" and as far as i know, no one gets ot or any braces for that. my write and type very slowly, so i make loads of mistakes. i *can* write (kinda) okay. i just can't be bothered most of the time.
 
i used to tell people that i hated writing and i didn't realize until i was probably 25 or so that writing isn't fundamentally a physical activity. which sounds absurd, but for my entire life, writing and typing has been painful. i thought it was that way for everyone. i thought it was like jogging or whatever. everyone else is just weird and enjoys the pain.

jogging hurts for everyone, right?
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Offline responsiblek9

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2017, 05:06:42 PM »
Laugh. Am having some vision issues so my spelling and syntax has somewhat suffered over the years.

But basically , Yes.
Was cheaper to DNA screen for this issue which has shown up in a carrier status in dogs kin to this older service dog.
If Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Progressive Rod-Cone Degeneration (PRCD Exon 1) is eliminated as a possible then a simple CERF exam for about 50 bucks will suffice to look for cataracts and more easily diagnosed issues.
PRA causes progressive, nonpainful vision loss.
There are two types of photoreceptors: rods, which gather information about light intensity and are the major contributors to night vision, and cones, which distinguish color and are the major contributors to day vision. In nearly all forms of PRA, the rod cells are affected first, leading to night blindness.

And since I was already screening my guys at this time was easy to just order another test to use for the older service dog for the owner. Does not cost her anything and i get the info I needed to make sure he was not having something that could seriously impact his use . He is set to retire next year in the fall, but still better to know now than later.

I had previously screened this older SD for DM Degenerative Myelopathy (SOD1 Exon 2)  for background genetic research because had suspicions since the breeder had protested too much that he had never had DM or carriers of DM in his dogs and never would. Well I decided better go look.
So tested Wisp, Cypher, Marble, Guess , This older service dog, and my puppy Mythos.
Out of those Wisp , Guess, Mythos and this older SD showed carrier status..
Cypher and Marble and all their offspring I bred are clear of DM. That includes Secret.

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usually show signs until they are at least eight years old.
 In the chessies it may not show up until they are 11 or 12 in the longer lived bloodlines.

I was seeing how far back in the bloodlines it might pop up and it sure did. Easy enough to breed out if one is paying attention.

 

A thousand miles you walked with me ,
 Through the fields and streams
  Down many a lonely place, On darkened  paths and streets

Offline EverConfused

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #7 on: July 05, 2017, 05:21:31 PM »
that's really interesting, responsiblek9.

also, cypher is an amazing name for a dog.
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Offline responsiblek9

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #8 on: July 05, 2017, 05:35:24 PM »
Ok there is a  DNA test out there which can screen for up to 160 genetic health issues. One specific to my breed and a bunch not. But since in my breed they were composed of other breeds sometimes other breed issues can be there. So tested for them all. Was $170 to do the Embark testing versus the GenSol single point tests at $40  per each test and would have to buy 5 tests to check for the 5 common genetic disease chessies can  have.  So this was attractively cost effective.
Plus I got genetic diversity and genetic coefficients as well as inherited physical characteristics results. Chessies can have or carry Von Willebrand Disease Type II and III , Most breeders dont screen for that either .

This is what Secret's health results were from Embark -

Clinical traits

These genetic traits are valuable to your veterinarian and can inform the clinical decisions and diagnoses they make.

Alanine Aminotransferase Activity result: Low Normal
Known to be highly expressed in liver cells, activity levels of alanine aminotransferase, or ALT, is a common value on most blood chemistry panels and is known to be a se…
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA has one copy of a mutation associated with reduced ALT activity as measured on veterinary blood chemistry panels. Please inform …
>

Not At Risk

Good news! Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA did not test positive for any of the genetic diseases that Embark screens for.

View the Full Disease Test Panel to see the entire battery of genetic health testing we performed for Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA, including diseases not presently known to affect her breed.

 
Carrier for 1 genetic condition

Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is a carrier for 1 of the genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
What does Carrier mean?

Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA has inherited a recessive allele for a genetic trait or mutation. This is not enough to cause symptoms of the disease, but is important to bear in mind if Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA ever has children.

CONDITION LIST

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA)
Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1)
EYES

 
Common conditions

Good news! Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA tested clear for 7 other common genetic diseases that Embark tests for.
CONDITION LIST

Multidrug Sensitivity
(MDR1)
CLINICAL

Sensitivity to certain classes of drugs, notably the parasiticide ivermectin, as well as certain gastroprotectant and anti-cancer medications, occurs in dogs with mutatio… >

Von Willebrand Disease Type II
(VWF Exon 28)
BLOOD

Coagulopathies represent a broad category of diseases that affect blood clotting, which can lead to symptoms such as excessive bruising or bleeding. Dogs with coagulopath… >

Primary Lens Luxation
(ADAMTS17)
EYES

This surgically correctable condition causes the lens to spontaneously detach from its normal residence within the pupil, leading to reduced visual acuity and irritation … >

Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis
(SLC2A9)
KIDNEY AND BLADDER

This condition causes kidney and bladder stones composed of urate; if caught early, it is responsive to dietary management. Uric acid is an intermediate of purine metabol… >

Degenerative Myelopathy
(SOD1 Exon 2)
BRAIN AND SPINAL CORD

A disease of mature dogs, this is a progressive degenerative disorder of the spinal cord that can cause muscle wasting and gait abnormalities. Affected dogs do not usuall… >

Dilated Cardiomyopathy
(PDK4)
HEART

The most common acquired heart disease of dogs, this is a progressive disease of the heart ventricles: early diagnosis and treatment is key. The ventricles are the heavil… >

Exercise-Induced Collapse
(DNM1)
MUSCULAR

First characterized in field-trial lines of Labrador Retriever dogs, this muscle disorder can cause episodes of muscle weakness and sometimes collapse; after recovering, …


Other Conditions: Clear of 152 >
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of 152 other genetic diseases that Embark tests for. Click here to see them all!

Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Blood conditions that Embark tests for.
P2RY12 Defect (P2RY12) >
Factor IX Deficiency, Hemophilia B (F9 Exon 7, Terrier Variant) >
Factor IX Deficiency, Hemophilia B (F9 Exon 7, Rhodesian Ridgeback Variant) >
Factor VII Deficiency (F7 Exon 5) >
Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A (F8 Exon 10, Boxer Variant) >
Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A (F8 Exon 11, Shepherd Variant 1) >
Factor VIII Deficiency, Hemophilia A (F8 Exon 1, Shepherd Variant 2) >
Thrombopathia (RASGRP2 Exon 5, Basset Hound Variant) >
Thrombopathia (RASGRP2 Exon :cool: >
Thrombopathia (RASGRP2 Exon 5, American Eskimo Dog Variant) >
Von Willebrand Disease Type II (VWF Exon 28) >
Von Willebrand Disease Type III (VWF Exon 4) >
Von Willebrand Disease Type I (VWF) >
Canine Leucocyte Adhesion Deficiency Type III (FERMT3) >
Congenital Macrothrombocytopenia (TUBB1 Exon 1, Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant) >
Canine Elliptocytosis (SPTB Exon 30) >
Cyclic Neutropenia, Gray Collie Syndrome (AP3B1 Exon 20) >
Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Type I (ITGA2B Exon 13) >
Glanzmann's Thrombasthenia Type I (ITGA2B Exon 12) >
May-Hegglin Anomaly (MYH9) >
Prekallikrein Deficiency (KLKB1 Exon :cool: >
Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKLR Exon 5) >
Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKLR Exon 7 Labrador Variant) >
Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKLR Exon 7 Pug Variant) >
Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKLR Exon 7 Beagle Variant) >
Pyruvate Kinase Deficiency (PKLR Exon 10) >
Trapped Neutrophil Syndrome (VPS13B) >
Ligneous Membranitis (PLG) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Hormones conditions that Embark tests for.
Congenital hypothyroidism (TPO Variant 1) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Immune conditions that Embark tests for.
Complement 3 (C3) deficiency (C3) >
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (PRKDC) >
Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (RAG1) >
X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (IL2RG Variant 1) >
X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (IL2RG Variant 2) >
Health
Carrier
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is a carrier for 1 of the Eyes conditions that Embark tests for.
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Progressive rod-cone degeneration (PRCD Exon 1) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Rod-cone dysplasia, rcd1 (PDE6B Exon 21 Irish Setter Variant) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Rod-cone dysplasia, rcd1a (PDE6B Exon 21 Sloughi Variant) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Rod-cone dysplasia, rcd3 (PDE6A) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) (CNGA1 Exon 9) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) (CNGB1) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) (SAG) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Golden Retriever PRA 2 (TTC8) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Cone-rod dystrophy 1, crd1 (PDE6B) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Cone-rod dystrophy 2, crd2 (IQCB1) >
Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) Cone-rod dystrophy, crd4/cord1 (RPGRIP1) >
Collie Eye Anomaly, Choroidal hypoplasia (NHEJ1) >
Day blindness, Achromatopsia, Cone Degeneration (CNGB3 Exon 6) >
Achromatopsia (CNGA3 Exon 7 German Shepherd Variant) >
Achromatopsia (CNGA3 Exon 7 Labrador Retriever Variant) >
Autosomal Dominant Progressive Retinal Atrophy (RHO) >
Canine Multifocal Retinopathy cmr1 (BEST1 Exon 2) >
Canine Multifocal Retinopathy cmr2 (BEST1 Exon 5) >
Canine Multifocal Retinopathy cmr3 (BEST1 Exon 10 Deletion) >
Canine Multifocal Retinopathy cmr3 (BEST1 Exon 10 SNP) >
Glaucoma Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (ADAMTS10 Exon 9) >
Glaucoma Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (ADAMTS10 Exon 17) >
Glaucoma Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (ADAMTS17 Exon 12) >
Hereditary Cataracts, Early-Onset Cataracts, Juvenile Cataracts (HSF4 Exon 9 Boston Terrier Variant) >
Primary Lens Luxation (ADAMTS17) >
Congenital stationary night blindness (RPE65) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Kidney and Bladder conditions that Embark tests for.
2,8-Dihydroxyadenine (2,8-DHA) Urolithiasis (APRT) >
Cystinuria Type I-A (SLC3A1) >
Cystinuria Type II-A (SLC3A1) >
Cystinuria Type II-B (SLC7A9) >
Hyperuricosuria and Hyperuricemia or Urolithiasis (SLC2A9) >
Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD1) >
Primary Hyperoxaluria (AGXT) >
Protein Losing Nephropathy (NPHS1) >
X-Linked Hereditary Nephropathy (COL4A5 Exon 35) >
Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Nephropathy (COL4A4 Exon 30) >
Autosomal Recessive Hereditary Nephropathy (COL4A4 Exon 3) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Multisystem conditions that Embark tests for.
Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (CCDC39 Exon 3) >
Congenital Keratoconjuctivitis Sicca and Ichthyosiform Dermatosis (CKCSID), Dry Eye Curly Coat Syndrome (FAM83H Exon 5) >
X-linked Ectodermal Dysplasia, Anhydrotic Ectoderal Dysplasia (EDA Intron :cool: >
Renal Cystadenocarcinoma and Nodular Dermatofibrosis (RCND) (FLCN Exon 7) >
Glycogen Storage Disease Type II, Pompe's Disease (GAA) >
Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia, Von Gierke Disease (G6PC) >
Glycogen Storage Disease Type IIIa (GSD IIIa) (AGL) >
Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA, Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A (SGSH Exon 6 Variant 1) >
Mucopolysaccharidosis Type IIIA, Sanfilippo Syndrome Type A (SGSH Exon 6 Variant 2) >
Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome (GUSB Exon 5) >
Mucopolysaccharidosis Type VII, Sly Syndrome (GUSB Exon 3) >
Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKM Exon 21) >
Glycogen storage disease Type VII, Phosphofructokinase deficiency (PFKM Exon :cool: >
Lagotto Storage Disease (ATG4D) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1 (PPT1 Exon :cool: >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 2 (TPP1 Exon 4) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1 (ARSG Exon 2) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 1 (CLN5 Exon 4 Variant 1) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 6 (CLN6 Exon 7) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 8 (CLN8 Exon 2) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (MFSD8) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN8) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis 10 (CTSD Exon 5) >
Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (CLN5 Exon 4 Variant 2) >
Adult-Onset Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (ATP13A2) >
Gangliosidosis GM1 Gangliosidosis (GLB1 Exon 15 Shiba Inu Variant) >
Gangliosidosis GM1 Gangliosidosis (GLB1 Exon 15 Alaskan Husky Variant) >
Gangliosidosis GM1 Gangliosidosis (GLB1 Exon 2) >
Gangliosidosis GM2 Gangliosidosis (HEXB Exon 3) >
Gangliosidosis GM2 Gangliosidosis (HEXA) >
Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy, Krabbe's disease (GALC Exon 5) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Other Systems conditions that Embark tests for.
Autosomal Recessive Amelogenesis Imperfecta (ENAM) >
Persistent Mullerian Duct Syndrome (AMHR2) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Brain and Spinal Cord conditions that Embark tests for.
Alaskan Husky Encephalopathy, Subacute Necrotizing Encephalomyelopathy (SLC19A3) >
Alexander Disease (GFAP) >
Cerebellar Abiotrophy, Neonatal Cerebellar Cortical Degeneration (SPTBN2) >
Cerebellar Ataxia, Progressive Early-Onset Cerebellar Ataxia (SEL1L) >
Cerebellar Hypoplasia (VLDLR) >
Spinocerebellar Ataxia, Late-Onset Ataxia (CAPN1) >
Spinocerebellar Ataxia with Myokymia and/or Seizures (KCNJ10) >
Benign Familial Juvenile Epilepsy, Remitting Focal Epilepsy (LGI2) >
Degenerative Myelopathy (SOD1 Exon 2) >
Fetal-Onset Neonatal Neuroaxonal Dystrophy (MFN2) >
Hypomyelination and Tremors (FNIP2) >
Shaking Puppy Syndrome, X-linked Generalized Tremor Syndrome (PLP) >
L-2-Hydroxyglutaricaciduria (L2HGDH) >
Neonatal Encephalopathy with Seizures (NEWS) (ATF2) >
Polyneuropathy (NDRG1 Exon 15) >
Polyneuropathy (NDRG1 Exon 4) >
Narcolepsy (HCRTR2 Intron 6) >
Progressive Neuronal Abiotrophy (Canine Multiple System Degeneration) (SERAC1 Exon 15) >
Progressive Neuronal Abiotrophy (Canine Multiple System Degeneration) (SERAC1 Exon 4) >
Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy (HSAN), Acral Mutilation Syndrome (GDNF-AS) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Heart conditions that Embark tests for.
Dilated Cardiomyopathy (PDK4) >
Long QT Syndrome (KCNQ1) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Muscular conditions that Embark tests for.
Muscular Dystrophy Muscular Dystrophy (DMD Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Variant) >
Muscular Dystrophy Muscular Dystrophy (DMD Pembroke Welsh Corgi Variant ) >
Muscular Dystrophy Muscular Dystrophy (DMD Golden Retriever Variant) >
Centronuclear Myopathy (PTPLA) >
Exercise-Induced Collapse (DNM1) >
Inherited Myopathy of Great Danes (BIN1) >
Myotonia Congenita (CLCN1 Exon 7) >
Myotonia Congenita (CLCN1 Exon 23) >
Myotubular Myopathy 1, X-linked Myotubular Myopathy (MTM1) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Metabolic conditions that Embark tests for.
Hypocatalasia, Acatalasemia (CAT) >
Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Deficiency (PDP1) >
Malignant Hyperthermia (RYR1) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Gastro-intestinal conditions that Embark tests for.
Imerslund-Grasbeck Syndrome, Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption (CUBN Exon 53) >
Imerslund-Grasbeck Syndrome, Selective Cobalamin Malabsorption (CUBN Exon :cool: >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Neuro-muscular conditions that Embark tests for.
Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (CHAT) >
Congenital Myasthenic Syndrome (COLQ) >
Episodic Falling Syndrome (BCAN) >
Health
Clear
Wildhorse's Secret Enigma By Wyndham CGCA is clear of all the Skin conditions that Embark tests for.
Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (COL7A1) >
Ectodermal Dysplasia, Skin Fragility Syndrome (PKP1) >
Ichthyosis, Epidermolytic Hyperkeratosis (KRT10) >
Ichthyosis (PNPLA1) >
Focal Non-Epidermolytic Palmoplantar Keratoderma, Pachyonychia Congenita (KRT16) >
Hereditary Footpad Hyperkeratosis (FAM83G) >
Hereditary Nasal Parakeratosis (SUV39H2) >
Musladin-Lueke Syndrome (ADAMTSL2) >
Health
__________________________

Inbreeding Coefficient 9%,   Most chessies run around 20%

MHC Class II - DLA DRB1 High Diversity
CHROMOSOME 12
A Dog Leukocyte Antigen (DLA) gene, DRB1 encodes a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein involved in the immune response. Some studies have shown associations between certain DRB1 haplotypes and autoimmune diseases such as Cushing's disease,

MHC Class II - DLA DQA1 and DQB1 High Diversity
CHROMOSOME 12
DQA1 and DQB1 are two tightly linked DLA genes that code for MHC proteins involved in the immune response. A number of studies have shown correlations of DQA-DQB1 haplotypes and certain autoimmune diseases

TRAITS

Coat Color

E Locus (Mask/Grizzle/Red) Ee
K Locus (Dominant Black) KBky
A Locus (Agouti) ayat
D Locus (Dilute) DD
B Locus (Brown/Chocolate/Liver) bb
Other Coat Traits

Furnishings / Improper Coat (RSPO2) II
Long Haircoat (FGF5) GG
Shedding (MC5R) CC
Curly Coat (KRT71) TT
Body Size

IGF1 NN
IGF1R GG
STC2 TT
GHR (E195K) GG
GHR (P177L) CC
Other Body Features

Brachycephaly (BMP3) CC
Natural Bobtail (T) CC
Hind Dewclaws (LMBR1) CC
Performance

Altitude Adaptation (EPAS1) GG

Genetic Diversity

Inbreeding Coefficient 9%
MHC Class II - DLA DRB1 High Diversity
MHC Class II - DLA DQA1 and DQB1 High Diversity


A thousand miles you walked with me ,
 Through the fields and streams
  Down many a lonely place, On darkened  paths and streets

Offline EverConfused

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2017, 08:32:11 AM »
whoa, they test for a whole lot of stuff.

can i ask some questions about breeding? this is purely out of curiosity, so if you don't have time to answer, i understand. i am not trying to become a breeder, so no need to worry about my starting a colony of franken-dogs in my two room apartment or anything.

if anyone has references they want to link me to, that'd be great too. the last time i looked i wasn't really able to judge the quality of the information. i'm not sure what sources are reputable. even just a couple names of authors, websites, etc. would be enough. :smile:

1.
Quote
But since in my breed they were composed of other breeds sometimes other breed issues can be there.


interesting. is it mostly the same set of other issues? in other words, are there issues that show up in those other breeds that you don't need to worry about in chessies?


2. is it actually possible to create more low/non-shedding breeds or create strains of existing breeds that are shed less than average? if so, would it actually be desirable? or would you end up messing with other, more important traits?

there must be a reason the lab x poodle experiment in australia didn't work out. i guess i'm wondering if there's another way to get to less shedding (or almost none). was that failure due to the particular approach or was it something inherent in the nature of coat genetics?

 

i don't know anything about how long it takes to develop a breed and whether different traits take different lengths of time to be established. i don't know how poodles came to have the coats they have anyway.
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2017, 01:02:36 PM »
The initial efforts did not work because they were F1 (first generation).  They're past the ninth generation now and are close to (or maybe actually there by now) of getting dogs that breed true (all offspring are essentially the same as the parents, of the same type, not clones).

If you take the offspring from an F1 cross that most resemble the goal and breed them to other similar dogs, you get an F2 generation which are more similar to each other than the F1 generation were.  You keep refining with further generations.  Eventually you create a new breed.  You do not, however, create a new breed by breeding two dissimilar dogs together because all of the offspring will have random unrepeatable traits.  In other words, when you breed random F1 dogs to each other you do not get dogs essentially the same as the parents because the parents were still not essentially the same.

Can you produce a lower shedding or non-shedding breed?  Sure.  We already have them.  Poodle and bichon come to mind.  If you want a low shedding or non-shedding German shepherd, you can create that too with an outcross and iterations, but it won't be a GSD any more because being double coated defines what a GSD is.

Take Dalmatians for example.  They accidentally bred an important gene out of Dalmations, one necessary for urinary tract health.  In order to save the breed, someone did an outcross with another breed, I think some kind of pointer.  Then they tested the offspring and identified those who had recovered the needed gene from the outcross parent and bred those back to purebred Dalmatians.  Repeat that process over several generations and they now have dogs that are 99.9% pure Dalmatian, look and act like Dalmatians, but they have the missing gene.

Unfortunately the Dalmatian parent club is unwilling to register these dogs into the studbook to save the breed.  Stupidly short-sighted, IMO.  How is this different?  Having an unhealthy urinary tract is not an intentional defining characteristic of the breed.  It's not part of the breed standard.  A similar thing happened with cocker spaniels when they accidentally bred out the tear ducts.

How does this happen, the accidental removal of important genes?  By breeding dogs for the wrong reasons.  Breeding inadequate dogs for sentimental or cosmetic reasons.  Or having a gene pool that is too small, which happens when you have everybody running to breed to a small number of popular studs.
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Offline responsiblek9

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2017, 02:08:21 PM »
Ok the test I did was Embark and figured why not test for everything since the chessie is composed of many breeds in their foundation.
Dwarfism , collie eye anomoly, MDR1 . Von Wilbrande, for example  are in other breeds more commonly but can show up in the chessies. Also long coat genes and lack of coat curl and a bunch of other things were nice to check into.
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Offline responsiblek9

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2017, 02:18:33 PM »
In breeding and creating a breed one has to have a very specific goal in mind and not lose other traits you are trying to keep. So random people breeding two dogs together and not having a focus on what they are trying to breed toward and KEEP traits they need or are trying to improve. It like with the the labradoodle crosses . Labradors have like 7 sub-types with different energy levels , trainability and structure types. Some have different working drives ( Pointing labs , field trial lab lines, Show dogs, and european working lab lines all are quite different from each other)
I don't know about poodles but they probably have similar line issues.

So crossing any old lab with any poodle wont create much unless you have pinpointed exactly the specific lab lines and type that match best with the selected poodle line in temperament , trainability, intelligence and working ability with health clearances. It is not just a deal of crossing two purebred breeds to create something useful. Then getting those to breed true takes many generations to keep the brain intelligence trainability and the one coat trait you are trying to bring in. It is complicated and would take a wide breeder base to do it with a common goal in mind.
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Offline responsiblek9

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Re: Older service dog issues
« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2017, 02:31:33 PM »
Sometimes things from outcrosses can bump down generations in my breed.
So have to look at Collie issues and they do show up. like the MDR1 and collie eye anomoly and some other stuff,
Lab issues like EIC and other stuff.
Hound issues can crop up. Spaniels were inserted into the lines in the 20's
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