Author Topic: phone retrieval and now eating electronics  (Read 1678 times)

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Offline snow0160

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phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« on: February 05, 2017, 09:13:26 PM »
My dog brings me the phone when it rings.  I've been traveling for the past two weekends and have not been home.  My dad has been walking him three times a day because my parents live very close.  I came home last weekend and found a bunch of tags chewed off from my sofa.  This weekend I found an unplugged electric power brick chewed on.  My husband said he had found him chewing on my phone once.  Thankfully, it has very strong phone protector but he has NEVER chewed on anything that isn't his. This is very odd behavior and he is no longer teething.  He is 10 months old. I think this is boredom chewing because he was home alone for the weekend. This was our first vacation since we got him so I was surprised because it has never happened before.  He hasn't even eaten my sock or shoe..
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #1 on: February 05, 2017, 10:08:56 PM »
They still need to chew.  It's not just about teething.  Does he have appropriate chew toys and chew training?

At 10 months Tar was still capable of taking the handles off of cooking utensils and hairbrushes.  That boy was beavering through chews as fast as I could buy them for him.  He's four now and still has chews lying around that he actively uses (mostly antlers) and of course every other week or so I get them a special consumable chewie from the pet store.  Ruby is 11 and still she chews, though she doesn't beaver the way Tar can any more (she only has nubs for teeth). 
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2017, 06:46:50 AM »
funny you mention toys. My friends came over the other day and said he had more toys than her newborn child.  I have large chest next to his crate.  They are mostly stuffed animals and balls.  The chew toys he has are mainly rope toys, kongs,  and nylabones.  I wanted to get antlers but my husband said they kill deer to get them so I held off on purchasing because it kinda freaks me out.  I don't particularly have a problem with so maybe I should get them.   I even have two kong wobblers and many Nina Ottoson toys to encourage foraging behavior and problem-solving.
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Offline Ariel

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2017, 07:12:09 AM »
Antlers and Benebones are my dogs' favorites. Both are long lasting and do not splinter. As I type this Jubilee is chewing on her Benebone at the foot of my bed. I also have a bunch of toys and chews, so I have a box and only allow about 7-8 toys out at a time. I swap them out every 2-3 weeks. The fresh ones might as well be brand new.  :wink:

Puzzle toys are great, but those don't really allow for mindless chewing, which is what a lot of dogs really need to destress. Some dogs chew more than others, some only chew very high value edibles, others will chew literally anything you give them (and things you don't, if you don't provide them good options). Chewing is stress relief at the end of a long day too. Jubi likes to chew for anywhere up to about an hour before falling asleep at night. It just helps her relax.

These are Benebones by the way. I have two slightly scratched up years old Nylabones and three Benebones that all get regular use. The plastic does not come off in chunks like Nylabones and does not get sharp in that same way either, in addition to my dogs finding them to be highly preferential.
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #4 on: February 06, 2017, 08:15:46 AM »
I just got one of these last night and it is great.  I think Lucky doesn't chew very much.  His toys are pristine.  One time I brought a jolly ball with a handle to my mother in law's house and her two labs shredded that ball in 10 min.  She felt embarrassed but I thought it was funny because we've had that ball for months without much chew marks on it.  Certain breeds chew more than others but I need to not leave anything laying around while I am away from home from now on.  I really do think this all started when I taught him phone retrieval.  He has never done anything like this before.  My husband thinks I shouldn't have him retrieve the phone and do what the service dog program says which is to lead you to the phone rather than retrieve it. Since he likes to retrieve things, I taught him to retrieve the phone. Maybe I should undo this?
« Last Edit: February 06, 2017, 08:17:37 AM by snow0160 »
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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #5 on: February 06, 2017, 09:51:14 AM »
I don't think so. I don't think that doing the behavior the wrong way or anything like that is a cause for completely undoing it. Does it help you for him to retrieve the phone? Is he capable and okay with doing it? If so I think that it's worth keeping.

What I think that you should do is start from square one. Teach him as if he's never learned to retrieve the phone before. If you ever see him chewing on a phone or other electronic immediately correct and replace with a proper chewing material, then reward for chewing on that material. Then, at the same time, start teaching him to retrieve the phone again. Start by having him hold it, and if he chews it at all while holding it (readjusting his grip is different), do not reward for holding the treat. Wait until he pauses in his chewing, or try to C/T before he starts chewing in order to reward holding it still and hopefully send chewing the phone into extinction. Then build your way up through the steps like you did when you first trained him to do the retrieve and hopefully, by the end of it all, everything should be fine.
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #6 on: February 06, 2017, 10:51:02 AM »
Yeah so far in his life he can chew almost everything he retrieves: balls, stuffed animals, and chew toys.  I think he must have this confused for toys. 
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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #7 on: February 06, 2017, 11:02:08 AM »
While dogs can make distinctions ("Oh, I can chew on the ball when I fetch it for you, but the plastic phone thing isn't okay? Got it"), it might be easier all around if he isn't allowed to chew on things that he retrieves. Allow him to chew them any other time, but perhaps when you're giving the command for retrieving, he is expected to be on his best behavior. It's sort of like working for them; when you tell them that it's time to work they are meant to be serious and professional. When you tell them that it's playtime, they get to be fun and goofy. The same thing can go for retrieving, I would imagine.
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2017, 01:42:24 PM »
Thanks guys, this is helpful. Oh moonsong I have a story for you. I was walking my dog today in his normal spot and I went to the doggy bag station to get a bag and there was a falcon on it but I didn't notice so it scared the [censored] out of me and flew up to a tree. So i go about walking Lucky around the open grass area and I seee the falcon staring at me from the tree above. I go on to ignore it and the dog doesn't even notice it's presence. I look down repoinding to work emails. Then out of nowhere this bird dive bombs me. I mean this was 2'inches from my head. My African Grey used to do this to my dog when she first learned how to fly but this was insane because the bird was huge. It is bigger than a hyacinths macaw. The dog didn't even care because he was lower on the ground but I'm 5'8". I told my husband about this and apparently this bird has been living here for months. He really likes its company and he says he doesn't mess with it because it is huge. In fact I'm not sure it is a falcon. I don't think I messed with it at all but I must have startled him and he got revenge. These guys must be territorial. Any thoughts?
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2017, 01:46:53 PM »
Ok after some online research this is definitely a hawk and not a falcon. It is way too big to be a falcon
« Last Edit: February 06, 2017, 01:48:47 PM by snow0160 »
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Offline Summertime.and.Azkaban

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #10 on: February 06, 2017, 01:58:59 PM »
Going back to antlers, I wanted to tell you they don't kill deer to get them. Antlers are shed yearly, which is what makes them different from horns which are permanent. The antlers you buy in the pet store are almost always naturally shed naturally and collected off of the ground.

Quote
Antlers grow very quickly - faster than any other kind of bone - up to one inch per day during the summer! As they get larger they begin to branch out and are covered with a thin skin of fine fur called velvet. At this time the blood that flows to the antlers stops, and then they begin to harden. When the antlers have reached their full growth, the protective velvet covering dries and the deer will rub the velvet off on trees. Finally in the winter, the antlers fall off, but with each successive year's growth, the antlers branch into more points until the deer has reached his prime.
http://www.petexpertise.com/about-antler-dog-chews.html

As long as the packaging says "naturally shed" the deer/elk didn't lose his life to donate his antlers to your dogs.  :biggrin:
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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #11 on: February 06, 2017, 02:07:59 PM »
Going back to antlers, I wanted to tell you they don't kill deer to get them. Antlers are shed yearly, which is what makes them different from horns which are permanent. The antlers you buy in the pet store are almost always naturally shed naturally and collected off of the ground.

Quote
Antlers grow very quickly - faster than any other kind of bone - up to one inch per day during the summer! As they get larger they begin to branch out and are covered with a thin skin of fine fur called velvet. At this time the blood that flows to the antlers stops, and then they begin to harden. When the antlers have reached their full growth, the protective velvet covering dries and the deer will rub the velvet off on trees. Finally in the winter, the antlers fall off, but with each successive year's growth, the antlers branch into more points until the deer has reached his prime.
http://www.petexpertise.com/about-antler-dog-chews.html

As long as the packaging says "naturally shed" the deer/elk didn't lose his life to donate his antlers to your dogs.  :biggrin:

This is good for me to hear! I bought Max an antler a few months ago with the hope that it would keep him busy while in my room so that he doesn't do other, less desirable behaviors. Being a huge environmentalist, I had felt really bad about buying the antler but was also really determined to find him something safe and durable to keep him busy that wasn't a rawhide material. What you said makes me feel much better about it.
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #12 on: February 06, 2017, 03:21:52 PM »
Yep very good news
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #13 on: February 06, 2017, 06:21:50 PM »
funny you mention toys. My friends came over the other day and said he had more toys than her newborn child.  I have large chest next to his crate.  They are mostly stuffed animals and balls.  The chew toys he has are mainly rope toys, kongs,  and nylabones.  I wanted to get antlers but my husband said they kill deer to get them so I held off on purchasing because it kinda freaks me out.  I don't particularly have a problem with so maybe I should get them.   I even have two kong wobblers and many Nina Ottoson toys to encourage foraging behavior and problem-solving.

stuffed animals, rope toys* and kongs are not chew toys.  If the dog has been taught to chew nylabones some dogs will chew on them but most of the dogs I know consider them boring (other than the edible ones or the flavor injected ones).  A kong wobbler is not a chew toy either.

Other than nylabone type toys, chews will include antlers, bones, hooves, horns, hymalayan chews, raw hide, some stuffed toys (like a kong stuffed tightly with kibble), pig ears, dental chews (like greenies).

According to Tar and others I have known, to give real satisfaction a chew must be slowly disassembled and consumed.

And a dog has to be taught to chew.  I started Tardis with raw bones because that is what his breeder recommended.  I put him in the puppy pen with a bone to minimize mess and also to help him to focus.  It was him and the bone and nothing else in the play pen.  He learned to settle down quietly and get to work on the bone.  Later he generalized antlers and other chews.

Cole wasn't taught to chew as a puppy because he grew up in a kennel.  It was hard getting him started and pretty much the only thing he would chew were booda velvets and later chicken necks and duck feet.

*rope toys can shed threads or strings that can be swallowed and cause a blockage in the gut, so a dog playing with a rope toy should be closely supervised to make sure he isn't swallowing any of it.

======

Antlers are free for the taking if you walk around where deer and elk rut.  They shed them every year.  So there is no need to kill a deer for his antlers although I imagine the antlers of deer that are shot for meat, if their rack is not trophy worthy, may find their way into the pet antler market.  Waste not, want not.
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Offline snow0160

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Re: phone retrieval and now eating electronics
« Reply #14 on: February 07, 2017, 08:19:23 PM »
And a dog has to be taught to chew.  I started Tardis with raw bones because that is what his breeder recommended.  I put him in the puppy pen with a bone to minimize mess and also to help him to focus.  It was him and the bone and nothing else in the play pen.  He learned to settle down quietly and get to work on the bone.  Later he generalized antlers and other chews.

So interesting that they have to be taught to chew. I've noticed that I have to introduce him to different shape and surface items. 
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