Author Topic: The Life of Reilly  (Read 735 times)

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Offline daretodream

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The Life of Reilly
« on: January 24, 2017, 12:44:21 PM »
I'm new to the Forum, but I thought I'd post a little about my little SD candidate, since I am amazed at his progress in such a short amount of time.

Reilly is 9 and a half week old, and I've only had him since Friday.  He already sits by the back door when he needs to go potty and usually comes running to me when I call him (though I am unsure if he really knows his name or just recognizes my voice).  Using his kibble as a treat, Reilly will "sit" and "lay down" with puppy exuberance.  He also frequently trips over his big paws as he is running.

Unfortunately, I've been unable to take him out of the house much, as he has been battling hookworms.  He had them as a very young puppy, and the early treatment hasn't been entirely successful.  I should mention that Reilly is a rescue puppy and arrived at the shelter already infested.  In the meantime, he gets plenty of playtime with my 2 year old terrier/poodle mix and enjoys a good romp around the backyard.

As soon as he gets better, he will be attending a Puppy Preschool class, and I will begin taking him out and about as much as possible (in dog-friendly places).

Any advice/suggestions are always greatly appreciated!

-Jessica

 

Offline snow0160

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Re: The Life of Reilly
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2017, 09:13:12 PM »
You want to start looking at basic obedience and CGC at 16 weeks.  You can take the CGC at 6 months but it takes a lot of daily practice.  The skills for CGC are great for setting a foundation to build on.  Classes are a great environment to teach your dog with distractions as well.  As you further pursue training you want to train him in different locations.  Find a treat that has very high value when you teach him a new skill and he would learn faster. You can always phase out the treats once he understands what you want to do. I would also start looking into clicker training.  This is a good age to practice "focus", which is a fundamental skill all SD should have.
poodle mix
"Success is going from failure to failure a loss in enthusiasm"-Winston Churchill

Offline daretodream

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Re: The Life of Reilly
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2017, 10:09:01 AM »
I took Reilly to the vet yesterday, and his current age was placed at 8 weeks, not 10 weeks like we had thought.  He got his first parvo-distemper vaccination, so we were advised not to have him around other dogs for a bit.  Does anyone know how long you have to wait until a puppy is not as at risk of catching contagious diseases?  And, in the mean time, any thoughts on safe ways to socialize him?   

Offline Kirsten

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Re: The Life of Reilly
« Reply #3 on: January 28, 2017, 12:00:25 PM »
It takes a year to get normal immunity. Until then you're playing the odds. Usually vets will release puppies to go to puppy class after the second set of shots but this varies. So ask your own vet when he can start school with other vaccinated puppies.

Sooner is better for social development, but later is better for disease prevention.
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest

Offline Kirsten

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Re: The Life of Reilly
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2017, 01:45:57 PM »
On socialition the first year....

When he is meeting new humans, invite them to pet his body while you occupy his head until after he has had his rabies shot.  In some areas the law requires it at 3 months of age, but most vets recommend doing it at four months.  Here's the thing, puppies tend to be little pirahnas with needle sharp puppy teeth.  Every thing goes into the mouth and gets nibbled.  It's not aggression, they're just babies.  I wind up with lots of small holes in my hands after helping out at puppy school.  I'm not going to report the puppy so long as he has his rabies vaccination and he stays in class so I continue to see him.  Quarantining a puppy during primary socialization can damage his development.  So don't give your pup a chance to playfully perforate a stranger who might report him to animal control.  Restrict him to opportunities to playfully perforate only known and trusted people until he has that rabies shot at either 3 or four months of age.  Let strangers pet him and talk to him, but keep their body parts out of range of his puppy teeth.

With other dogs, never allow pup during his first year to have physical contact with unknown dogs or rather dogs of unknown vaccination status.  There are periods during his development when he no longer has immunity from his mother and does not yet have immunity from his vaccinations because the two cancel eachother out.  You cannot know for sure when this period is, so what you do is limit his contact to only vaccinated dogs.  After the first year booster the dog is protected by vaccination like any adult dog.

Do not allow puppy to play with older or larger dogs unless you personally know of their feelings about puppies.  A lot of adults have low tolerance for puppy antics.  Others are smitten by puppies and will gently play with them.  Don't let your puppy be the guinea pig to find out which they are.

Get pup into a puppy kindergarten class just as soon as the vet gives the go ahead.  Puppy class is where you meet other vaccinated puppies and arrange safe play dates with puppies of a similar size, age, and energy level.  Try to expose puppy to as many different breeds as possible.  In other words, go to an all-breed school, not a school that speciallizes in a breed or certain breeds.

Be sure to expose puppy to other common domestic animals, such as cats, caged birds and small rodents, and farm animals if you live in a rural area.  When encounterin large animals, carry pup.

Make sure pup encounters people of all races, ethnicities, ages, sizes, and genders.

You also need to do habituation, or getting pup used to different sensory experiences, mostly flooring surfaces, but also sights and sounds.  Take pup to a playground where he can observe children running and squealing.  Let him experience the sensations of gravel, concrete, dirt, grass, vinyl, tile, wood, carpet, marble, etc. under his feet.  I have a glass top coffee table and I walk my puppies across it so they can exprience seeing air beneath their feet.  I pull them in carts and push them sitting in wheel chairs and wheeled office chairs so they get the experience of rolling on wheels.  I carry them in slings, down playground slides (held firmly in my lap), in shopping carts at pet stores only, and on porch swings.  We ride up and down in parking garage elevators.  We go for frequent car rides.

Do not let pup sniff poop from other dogs, especially unknown dogs as it can contain the parvo virus and this virus can live for a long time outside the body.  Also avoid dog parks which tend to have high rates of fecal contamination as well as unknown dogs of unknown dispositions toward puppies.
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest

Offline daretodream

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Re: The Life of Reilly
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2017, 08:45:24 PM »
Thank you all so much for the advice and information.  I took Reilly to a local boutique-style dog store that is almost always empty.  He would quietly sit every time I would stop to look at something- without being asked.  He also got the opportunity to meet two toddlers, and he did great (no jumping or excessive licking).  I'm really impressed with his behavior thus far.

He is, however, a little unsure of new noises.  Walking through a parking lot on foot for the first time appeared to make him a little nervous.  At home, he looks to his older four-legged sister for assurance.  But, she isn't going to be with us on most outings.  Will he become less sensitive as he is exposed to more sounds?  Is there anything I can do to help him out?