Author Topic: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells  (Read 942 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Alexmenol

  • New Member
  • *
  • Posts: 11
  • **THIS IS A TROLL (NOW BANNED)**
  • Mood: Dazed
  • SDC interest: ESA owner
Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« on: September 30, 2016, 10:00:57 AM »
My baby girl is 5 months old, and never could get her to go on a pee pad,which was my firt choice in potty training,she would eat the plastic and play with it. So I take her outside, Im really good about taking her out because she never goes to the door.I stand out there until she does her business, but I live in Michigan and its raining and going to snow to night. Its going to be a long winter, any suggestion on getting her to go on pee pad?

Offline Kirsten

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 39470
  • Have a flufftastic day!
  • Location: Missouri, USA
  • Mood: Okay
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #1 on: September 30, 2016, 09:17:30 PM »
Five months should be old enough to handle bad weather unless she's a toy breed.

Unfortunately, she needs to go out in the weather for more than toileting.  At her age especially she needs long walks for safe exercise, mental stimulation and socialization.  She needs to smell the smells of all the activity in her neighborhood, all the dogs, animals, and humans who have been moving about during the day.  She needs to see the sights of normal human and domestic animal activity and become familiar with different forms of weather.

Without those daily outings to walk around the neighborhood she's not going to develop properly.  I understand she's an ESA and doesn't have to be prepared to do public access like a PA service dog, but this is true for even a pet dog.  Dogs without sufficient social engagement with their communities can develop bad habits and anxieties.  So even if you use piddle pads sometimes, it's important for her to have daily outings.

As far as how you get them to use them, you can purchase piddle pads that are impregnated with a chemical that smells like urine to them or you can impregnate the pads with her own urine by catching some in a cup when she urinates outside and then dribbling it on the pad.

Or find someone with a dog that uses piddle pads and hang out with that dog for the "monkey see, monkey do" effect.  Dogs will copy behaviors of other dogs, especially when you pair a young dog with an experienced older dog.
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest

Offline Azariah

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2431
  • Location: Midwest United States
  • Mood: Tired
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #2 on: September 30, 2016, 11:36:19 PM »
My disability prevents me from being outside much in the winter. I have no natural moisture going into my nose and the cold air (with no humidity) dries me out worse. I have major respiratory issues and the cold can also make it hard to breathe for me.

BUT...my dogs still need exercise in the winter. Plain and simple. So I spend a LOT of time at the local training club and obedience club. The local training club I can use unlimited (sharing with others) for $20 a month. It is climate controlled. the obedience club I can use for $200 a year OR I can pay $50 and always go with a friend that has a key. I'm doing the latter right now as I live 5 mins from the local training club. I also work in indoor places that allow pets such as some sports stores and home improvement stores. And there are a few places of the indoor skywalk that used to work. All of these are pretty well climate controlled and allow my dogs plenty of room to get exercise.

Once my dogs are potty trained they also run with each other (and often the kids) in our backyard in the winter. That gives them some additional exercise when I can't.

Invisible physical and mental disabilities.
Advanced experience training obedience dogs. Very new to training service dogs.
Current Samoyeds: Rio (11), Cosmo (3), Serenity (SDiT)

Offline Azariah

  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Posts: 2431
  • Location: Midwest United States
  • Mood: Tired
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #3 on: September 30, 2016, 11:40:14 PM »
This is the style of puppy pad I used with my senior dog when he could no longer safely walk outside in the winter. Hemoglpyic anemia and wounds would not clot. It does NOT have plastic on the bottom. A puppy can still chew the edges but they are more durable than a lot I have seen. Do not use dryer sheets with them. They make different sizes. I bought 6 total with Casper and 3 covered my main living area (letting me have 3 to change out during washes). He was on prednisone and a full grown dog - there was a LOT of pee. The pads saved my back and let us enjoy the last couple of months that we had together. Towards the end I literally had to help him stand with a life vest to poop. He would cry first as he didn't want to be in it. It was terrible for my pain but I'd do it again for him.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003B3S3OS/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Invisible physical and mental disabilities.
Advanced experience training obedience dogs. Very new to training service dogs.
Current Samoyeds: Rio (11), Cosmo (3), Serenity (SDiT)

Offline Summertime.and.Azkaban

  • Resident Terrier Wrangler
  • Old Timer
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
  • Holli and Azkaban
  • Location: North Carolina USA
  • Mood: Tired
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2016, 03:28:57 PM »
I never used potty pads with my dogs when they were being housebroken. Being told they can potty indoors but only sometimes in some places can confuse a young dog.

I prefer to set a hard and fast "no potty in the house" until the dogs has a solid grasp of the "go potty" command. Once the dog can toilet on command I introduce the idea of toileting on command on a potty pad in the bathtub. Only the bathtub or shower. And only on command. I don't leave potty pads down 24/7 to be used at will. I believe a potty pad should be used only on command or with the handler's invitation. Allowing a dog to relieve themselves indoors at will can damage toilet training.

No advice on toilet training a non-housebroken dog to use potty pads because it's not something I'm familiar with. We did have a geriatric JRT when I was young who lived outside and came in when it got too cold outside. She was unwilling to toilet inside when she was confined to a room due to a hip fracture. We had to use human urine (ew. I know) to indicate to her that that was where she needed to eliminate. It worked well. They make plastic trays that hold down pads and keep babies from chewing them or moving and sliding them when they play. Perhaps that and some urine sampling on a pad would make the pads more doable for you.
-Azkaban, Rayner, and Chewy-
"I am not interested in picking up crumbs of compassion thrown from the table of someone who considers himself my master. I want the full menu of rights" -Desmond Tutu
PM me about being pen pals or receiving a holiday card in the mail!

Offline Kirsten

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 39470
  • Have a flufftastic day!
  • Location: Missouri, USA
  • Mood: Okay
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2016, 08:19:04 PM »
I agree about not introducing piddle pads until after house training is solid and denning (a strong aversion to soiling one's den, i.e. our home) is well established.
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest

Offline Candy3

  • Loquacious Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 948
  • Location: CA
  • Mood: Okay
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #6 on: February 28, 2017, 09:37:16 PM »
I realize that the OP is an old post, but my experience with potty pads has been positive. So far, anyway.

We've used Sophresh potty pads consistently since we brought our puppy home at 9 weeks old. Even before we said anything to him, he knew that that was where he had to potty. WE never had to train him. He automatically used the potty pad every single time. I thought that maybe we had this miracle puppy, but eventually decided that it was probably just a very good potty pad.

He is four months old, now, and still never pees anywhere but on the potty pad.  Even when we take him to other people's houses, he won't pee there. He waits until he gets home to pee on his pad. That means short visits.

Because of our situation, we have not been able to take him outside for potty training. That will begin soon. It should be interesting.

Offline Kirsten

  • Administrator
  • *****
  • Posts: 39470
  • Have a flufftastic day!
  • Location: Missouri, USA
  • Mood: Okay
  • SDC interest: owner-trainer
Re: Pee pads, was re:Potty Training Bells
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2017, 01:32:53 AM »
The problem with piddle pads is not that puppies won't use them but that you are generalizing urinating and defecating inside the house as a good thing.  This blurs the line for appropriate toileting behavior.  You won't see this problem at four months.  You'll see it when the dog starts to find it inconvenient to go outside (when they are a little sick or a little infirm and are physically capable of holding it but don't feel a strong urge to keep the den clean).

All but one of my dogs were taught zero fault toilet training with NO indoor toileting permitted.  The dogs that underwent that training were utterly reliable in my home, in their crates, in public.  The one dog that was allowed to toilet in a puppy pen due to circumstances that limited my ability to supervise her is Ruby.  She has never been as reliable as the others.  Now, she is elderly and I'm having some problems with her toileting by the back door instead of asking to be taken out.  The difference between the two styles of toilet training is so significant that Tardis feels a strong urge to prevent Ruby from toileting indoors and he'll come running to me and rat on her when she starts for the back door to toilet in silence.
Kirsten and Tardis
In loving memory of Cole (1/11/99 - 6/26/12)  He gave me back my life.

"The one absolute, unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world -- the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous -- is his dog." -George G. Vest