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First Aid For Pets

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Ilghaus:
First Aid Kit
http://animalservices2000.org/content/node/101
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From the ARC Website
http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/firstaid.html
LINK IS NO LONGER ACTIVE

Quote:
Vital Statistics:

Pulse and Heart Rate
Normal resting rates:
Cats: 150-200 bpm
Small dogs: 90-120 bpm
Medium dogs: 70-110 bpm
Large dogs: 60-90 bpm
Pulse should be strong, regular and easy to locate.

Checking the pulse
The easiest place to locate a pulse is the femoral artery in the groin area. Place your fingers on the inside of the hind leg and slide your hand upward until the back of your fingers touches the abdomen. Gently move your fingers back and forth on the inside of the hind leg until you feel the pulsing blood. Count the number of pulses in 15 seconds and multiply that number by 4. This will give you the beats per minute (bpm).

Temperature
Normal temp. for dogs and cats: 100-102.5 degrees
Thermometer should be almost clean when removed.
Abnormalities are indicated by blood, diarrhea, or black, tarry stool.

Ilghaus:
Quote:
Basic First Aid Procedures
All of the following situations require immediate veterinary care.

Fractures
Muzzle animal.
Gently lay animal on a board, wooden door, tarp, etc. padded with blankets.
Secure animal to the support.
Do not attempt to set the fracture.
If a limb is broken, wrap the leg in cotton padding, then wrap with a magazine, rolled newspaper, towel or two sticks. Splint should extend one joint above the fracture and one joint below. Secure with tape. Make sure wrap does not constrict blood flow.
If the spine, ribs, hip, etc. appears injured or broken, gently place the animal on the stretcher and immobilize it if possible.

Bleeding (external)  
Muzzle animal.
Press thick gauze pad over wound. Hold firmly until clotting occurs.
If bleeding is severe, apply a tourniquet between the wound and the heart.
Loosen tourniquet for 20 seconds every 15-20 minutes.
A tourniquet is dangerous and should only be used in life-threatening hemorrhaging of a limb. It may result in amputation or disability of the limb.

Bleeding (internal)  
Symptoms: bleeding from nose, mouth, rectum; coughing blood; blood in urine; pale gums; collapse; rapid or weak pulse.
Keep animal as warm and quiet as possible.

Burns
Chemical
- Muzzle animal.
- Flush immediately with large quantities of cold water.

Severe
- Muzzle animal.
-Quickly apply ice water compresses.
-Treat for shock if necessary.

Shock
Symptoms: weak pulse; shallow breathing; nervousness; dazed appearance.
Often accompanies severe injury or extreme fright.
Keep animal restrained, quiet and warm.
If unconscious, keep head level with rest of body.

From the ARC Website
http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/firstaid.html

Ilghaus:
Quote:

If your animal is injured, you must restrain him/her for your safety as well as your pet's. Muzzle your pet to restrain it unless it is unconscious, has difficulty breathing or has a mouth injury.

Dogs--Muzzles

Speak and move calmly and quietly.
Have someone restrain the dog with a leash.
Approach dog from the side and behind its head; do not attempt to put muzzle on from the front.
Quickly slip a nylon or wire cage muzzle over nose, secure snugly behind ears.
If a muzzle is not available, you can make one from a strip of gauze, rag, necktie, belt or rope about 3 feet long.
Make a large loop in the center. Quickly slip loop over dog's nose.
Bring ends under chin. Tie snugly behind ears.

From the ARC Website
http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/firstaid.html

Ilghaus:
Lori H. Feldman, D.V.M.
Henry J. Feldman, M.D.
(c) 1996
Dr. Feldman is a Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York Licensed Veterinarian and a member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society. This document is primarliy aimed at EMS and Emergency Medical personel who may encounter animals in arrest.
Pet owners should consult their veterinarian for specific details on procedures outlined here.

Quote:
A. Airway
The first step in animal CPR (like human
CPR), after determining that the animal
is non-responsive, is to obtain an open
airway. You should not continue past AAirway,
until this step has been achieved!

Basic Version (Printout)
http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/acpr.html


For More Advanced Version (Printout)
http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/dogcpr.pdf

Ilghaus:
SOME SIGNS OF
HYPERTHERMIA--HEAT STROKE

NERVOUSNESS
RAPID FRANTIC BREATHING
BRIGHT RED TONGUE AND GUMS
THICK  AND  STICKY SALIVA
FOAMING AT THE MOUTH
WEAKNESS
RAPID PULSE
ELEVATED RECTAL TEMPERATURE
SHOCK

TREATMENT

REDUCE BODY TEMPERATURE
MOVE TO A COOL, SHADED AREA
DO NOT IMMERSE IN COLD WATER
SPRAY THE ANIMAL WITH COOL WATER
WRAP IN WET COOL TOWEL
MONITOR THE RECTAL TEMPERATURE
TREAT FOR SHOCK
TRANSPORT TO THE VET ASAP

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