Author Topic: First Aid For Pets  (Read 12575 times)

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Offline Ilghaus

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First Aid For Pets
« on: April 01, 2006, 12:30:32 AM »
First Aid Kit
http://animalservices2000.org/content/node/101
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the ARC Website
http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/firstaid.html
LINK IS NO LONGER ACTIVE

Quote:
Vital Statistics:

Pulse and Heart Rate
Normal resting rates:
Cats: 150-200 bpm
Small dogs: 90-120 bpm
Medium dogs: 70-110 bpm
Large dogs: 60-90 bpm
Pulse should be strong, regular and easy to locate.

Checking the pulse
The easiest place to locate a pulse is the femoral artery in the groin area. Place your fingers on the inside of the hind leg and slide your hand upward until the back of your fingers touches the abdomen. Gently move your fingers back and forth on the inside of the hind leg until you feel the pulsing blood. Count the number of pulses in 15 seconds and multiply that number by 4. This will give you the beats per minute (bpm).

Temperature
Normal temp. for dogs and cats: 100-102.5 degrees
Thermometer should be almost clean when removed.
Abnormalities are indicated by blood, diarrhea, or black, tarry stool.

« Last Edit: July 26, 2010, 11:10:14 AM by Ilghaus »
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Offline Ilghaus

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2006, 12:35:42 AM »
Quote:
Basic First Aid Procedures
All of the following situations require immediate veterinary care.

Fractures
Muzzle animal.
Gently lay animal on a board, wooden door, tarp, etc. padded with blankets.
Secure animal to the support.
Do not attempt to set the fracture.
If a limb is broken, wrap the leg in cotton padding, then wrap with a magazine, rolled newspaper, towel or two sticks. Splint should extend one joint above the fracture and one joint below. Secure with tape. Make sure wrap does not constrict blood flow.
If the spine, ribs, hip, etc. appears injured or broken, gently place the animal on the stretcher and immobilize it if possible.

Bleeding (external)  
Muzzle animal.
Press thick gauze pad over wound. Hold firmly until clotting occurs.
If bleeding is severe, apply a tourniquet between the wound and the heart.
Loosen tourniquet for 20 seconds every 15-20 minutes.
A tourniquet is dangerous and should only be used in life-threatening hemorrhaging of a limb. It may result in amputation or disability of the limb.

Bleeding (internal)  
Symptoms: bleeding from nose, mouth, rectum; coughing blood; blood in urine; pale gums; collapse; rapid or weak pulse.
Keep animal as warm and quiet as possible.

Burns
Chemical
- Muzzle animal.
- Flush immediately with large quantities of cold water.

Severe
- Muzzle animal.
-Quickly apply ice water compresses.
-Treat for shock if necessary.

Shock
Symptoms: weak pulse; shallow breathing; nervousness; dazed appearance.
Often accompanies severe injury or extreme fright.
Keep animal restrained, quiet and warm.
If unconscious, keep head level with rest of body.

From the ARC Website
http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/firstaid.html
TJ
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Offline Ilghaus

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Restraint Methods
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2006, 12:42:33 AM »
Quote:

If your animal is injured, you must restrain him/her for your safety as well as your pet's. Muzzle your pet to restrain it unless it is unconscious, has difficulty breathing or has a mouth injury.

Dogs--Muzzles

Speak and move calmly and quietly.
Have someone restrain the dog with a leash.
Approach dog from the side and behind its head; do not attempt to put muzzle on from the front.
Quickly slip a nylon or wire cage muzzle over nose, secure snugly behind ears.
If a muzzle is not available, you can make one from a strip of gauze, rag, necktie, belt or rope about 3 feet long.
Make a large loop in the center. Quickly slip loop over dog's nose.
Bring ends under chin. Tie snugly behind ears.

From the ARC Website
http://www.redcross.org/services/disaster/beprepared/firstaid.html
TJ
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Offline Ilghaus

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Animal CPR
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2006, 12:48:39 AM »
Lori H. Feldman, D.V.M.
Henry J. Feldman, M.D.
(c) 1996
Dr. Feldman is a Massachusetts, Connecticut and New York Licensed Veterinarian and a member of the Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society. This document is primarliy aimed at EMS and Emergency Medical personel who may encounter animals in arrest.
Pet owners should consult their veterinarian for specific details on procedures outlined here.

Quote:
A. Airway
The first step in animal CPR (like human
CPR), after determining that the animal
is non-responsive, is to obtain an open
airway. You should not continue past AAirway,
until this step has been achieved!

Basic Version (Printout)
http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/acpr.html


For More Advanced Version (Printout)

http://members.aol.com/henryhbk/dogcpr.pdf
« Last Edit: April 01, 2006, 01:01:01 AM by Ilghaus »
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Offline Ilghaus

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Hyperthermia -- Heat Stroke
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2006, 01:09:26 AM »
SOME SIGNS OF
HYPERTHERMIA--HEAT STROKE

NERVOUSNESS
RAPID FRANTIC BREATHING
BRIGHT RED TONGUE AND GUMS
THICK  AND  STICKY SALIVA
FOAMING AT THE MOUTH
WEAKNESS
RAPID PULSE
ELEVATED RECTAL TEMPERATURE
SHOCK

TREATMENT

REDUCE BODY TEMPERATURE
MOVE TO A COOL, SHADED AREA
DO NOT IMMERSE IN COLD WATER
SPRAY THE ANIMAL WITH COOL WATER
WRAP IN WET COOL TOWEL
MONITOR THE RECTAL TEMPERATURE
TREAT FOR SHOCK
TRANSPORT TO THE VET ASAP
TJ
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Offline Pat J

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2006, 10:47:07 PM »
I am glad to hear that you liked the Pet First Aid course. I am a paid instructor for Red Cross (that's a fairly rare bird!) and last Saturday, I had the opportunity to do my first PFA course. I had a group of Girl Scouts, and we really enjoyed it! I would like to know from "somebody" since I can't get an answer from the Instructor Trainer (I probably ought to e-mail National ARC) is why is tourniquet even mentioned for dogs, when we haven't taught TQ for years for people? Yes, it says that the pet will probably lose its leg, but so would people! Would anybody have a "guess" about this? Pat
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Offline responsiblek9

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2006, 10:58:19 PM »
I believe it is because if the leg is so damaged on a pet it is more likely that a vet wont go to heroic measures to save the limb. I use pressure bandages on major artery/vein cuts . But then I dont have  my dogs trying to take my hands off either when I am working with them regarding severe injuries.
 If I run across a scrapper injured dog and have to drive it to the vet's I may have to tourniquet the dog's injured limb for transport whe i dont have someone with me who can handle the dog and keep the pressure on the pressure point needed. .
 So I can see why this is taught. Not many people will remember where the major  pressure points  are for holding pressure to reduce bleeding and also the transportation issue.

 Did they teach what to do with a punctured lung . I had a fun one with that one time with my buddies chessie who ran headlong into a rod and impaled her chest.  We saved the dog . Stunned the vet.
 Nora & crew
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Offline Ilghaus

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2006, 11:11:43 PM »
Quote
Yes, it says that the pet will probably lose its leg, but so would people! Would anybody have a "guess" about this?

It is only to be used as a last resort just like we are trained when we respond on scene at an accident. We are reminded over and over -- put that tourniquet on a limb and consider it lost. At that point you must make a decision, will my patient live if I don't sacrifice the limb.
TJ
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Offline Kirsten

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2006, 11:40:18 PM »
Dogs adjust to losing a limb better than people do. 

Ozzie may be having a leg amputated (the one that locked up).  But first we're working on a training wheelchair, one that keeps him from smashing his head into the ground but also doesn't support him too much so he has to use his legs if he wants to get anywhere (and he really does).  I hate to put him through the amputation surgery when I'm not sure he'd be able to walk even then.
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Offline my4winds

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2006, 02:16:52 PM »
Myra       

Offline Shidash

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #10 on: October 24, 2007, 06:26:01 PM »
What is a tourniquet and why is it dangerous? How is it used?

Offline responsiblek9

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2007, 02:56:42 AM »
 A tourniquet is like putting a rope around a limb to stop bleeding. But the danger is if you tourniquet a limb usually it cant be saved because the lack of circulation makes tissue die. So it is something of a last resort to save a life.

A pressure bandage is better because often direct pressure stops the bleeding  or slows it without cutting off the circulation to the rest of the limb. 
But many people dont know the difference.

You have to basically either do direct pressure with your hand or fingers to stop a badly bleeding wound . Or you need to make a bandage to where the pressure is directly on the bleeding area but allows for blood circulation to get past the bleeding area to the rest of the limb.

A red cross course on first aid is very useful to learn how to handle a bleeding emergency properly  and or when it might be best to touriquet a limb in an emergency. it is well worth the minimal charge they ask for their course.

 nora & crew
A thousand miles you walked with me ,
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  Down many a lonely place, On darkened  paths and streets

Offline Shidash

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #12 on: October 25, 2007, 06:17:21 AM »
Thanks :smile:. I understand it now. Unfortunately I don't know if a 13 year old could take the course and if I did, I don't know if I could help in an emergency.

Offline Ilghaus

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #13 on: October 25, 2007, 09:11:09 AM »
If you ever get a chance to take a first aid course please consider it. If you ever do sign up just speak with the instructor and let them know what your concerns are. They should be willing to give you a little extra help. There is always a lot of good info there and it doesn't really have to be a big emergency, just one of those things that are always happening in life. There are kids a lot younger then you that have done some pretty amazing things. You never know what you can do until you try.
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Offline worfmydog

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Re: First Aid For Pets
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2007, 03:13:56 AM »
Back when I taught the course you had to be at least 13 years old to come alone or you can come as young as 6 with a parent. So your at the perfect age. Taking the course not only teaches you basic First Aid it also can give you some self confidence. Knowing what to do  and knowing it well will help you in an emergency. You'll get through it to the other side doing what you have been taught practically on automatic.When taking the class you will practice actually doing what you've been taught over and over till it becomes something you do with out thinking.
Your instructors are taught, Students never fail, if they don't understand it's their job to find a way to explain it or figure out how you CAN do it. I taught for many years with the American Red Cross and with the American Heart Assoc. Both are wonderful there are some differences so choose one and stick with it. The classes are a lot of fun and very affordable. HAVE FUN ! :candycorn: :witch: :frank:
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