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glad its was cheap visit, I'm about to spend a butt load getting Teddy UTD on his shots, have his ears cleared, and hopefully he doesn't have an infection (its a constant issue with him even with mean cleaning them out often) and get his calming medication for grooming sessions plus its "time" for a professional groom (he goes every four months, then we just clip him with scissors in between. So yeah I'll be spending a good amount on him next month.

 
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That's good to hear!
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Forgot to update.

Zeus saw the vet last week and was diagnosed with a yeast infection in his left ear. Right ear was okay.

The vet put an infusion dose in his ear -it was $20, which was less expensive than the $40 course of drops would be. She said it was just that one infusion dose -then don't do anything to the ear for a month (no cleaning). Said the infusion usually is great at clearing up yeast in ears.

Zeus is still rubbing the left side of his head on the carpet periodically -but not frequently -maybe once a day if that. Hopefully that will get better with more time. He's still playful and retrieving things for me -and his usual self. Just can tell the ear bothers him a little. 

Was told to give him Benadryl also -it's safe to give with the Apoquel he's on -and it should help with the bit of itchiness he's having currently (man, the heavy rain has everything going haywire -I've been pretty sniffly myself -probably more mold spores around outside). I give that to him at bedtime so it doesn't affect his working (he's cleared to still work and has been working as normal -no sign of discomfort while working).
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Wait, I wonder if there was miscommunication. The LL might have meant that the "prescribing" letter should identify the dog you're getting, just so they can tell a snoopy neighbor, for example, that the big white fluffy dog is an ESD.  It sounds like you've gone about this exactly correctly, getting the letter and permission first, so you might go back to them and say you're happy to have the doctor update the letter to identify the dog you have chosen (spayed, female Samoyed named Rover) but they have to give permission before you get the dog, duh.

I think there's a liability issue for the doctor, though. The doctor can't determine whether Rover is a good ESA. The doctor can't determine if a Samoyed is the appropriate breed for their patient. The only thing the doctor can determine is whether their patient is disabled and if the ESA would aid in treatment. That's it. If they 'prescribe' a specific breed or individual dog and the patient does something bad with the dog, the doctor can be held legally responsible since they said that Rover was suited for ESA work when maybe she wasn't.

Also, it's not the doctor's job.

I also think it would be better to educate the landlords over what they're allowed to demand and what they aren't, rather than just giving in to their wishes and possibly putting the doctor into a place of legal responsibility.



Though honestly, based off of the OP's description, I have a feeling that the landlords are trying to drag out the process and avoid giving them permission for the ESA. Something tells me that even if the OP got the doctor to sign off on the breed, they would ask for something else. Perhaps they would ask for the doctor to sign off on the individual dog, or ask for it to pass the CGC first, or ask that the dog be 1 year of age before being brought home, etc etc. These are just random examples off of the top of my head, I'm not saying they're realistic. All I'm saying is I feel like, based off of the descriptions of these landlords so far, this is avoidance stuff and giving into this request will only cause them to think of more.
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Wait, I wonder if there was miscommunication. The LL might have meant that the "prescribing" letter should identify the dog you're getting, just so they can tell a snoopy neighbor, for example, that the big white fluffy dog is an ESD.  It sounds like you've gone about this exactly correctly, getting the letter and permission first, so you might go back to them and say you're happy to have the doctor update the letter to identify the dog you have chosen (spayed, female Samoyed named Rover) but they have to give permission before you get the dog, duh.
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That is a really good point. Perfectly said. Thank you!
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That's not a doctor's job.  Some doctors will refuse to do that and probably they should for liability reasons.  It's up to the doctor to make a determination about their human patient's condition.  That is their area of expertise.  It is not up to them to determine which dog is well suited to be a pet or which one is well behaved or whatever.  That's not in their area of expertise.

I suggest you send them a letter certified, return receipt requested, and point out that they're dragging this out an unreasonable amount of time and that you'd like a decision within ten business days.  Refer them to HUD if they need any guidance on their obligations under the Fair Housing Act.  That's what I would do.  I don't know you and I don't know your landlord so you'll have to make a judgment call about whether that is the best approach in your specific situation.
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A few months ago my therapist completed and faxed all forms required by my apartment management for an emotional support pet. They never responded even though I have called and left messages asking for an update, eventually the office did call me and asked me what kind of animal I was requesting and I said a dog. They called back and wanted to know the type of breed. I told them a Samoyed. Another two weeks went by and they never said anything further so I called them again and left messages wanting to know what was going on. Finally I got ahold of them and they told me that they needed me to bring the papers back to the therapist and have him write the specific breed on my papers. Mind you I haven't been approved or declined for an esa at this point but just wondering if this is usual practice for landlords to request that the therapist prescribe a specific breed because I was under the impression that it was personal choice. I do live in a community that has a no pet policy but there are a few people that live here that have dogs and cats and I am assuming they also had to get an esa letter. I did send the forms back to my therapist but it's going on three months since I applied.
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Emotional Support Animals (publicly viewable board) / Re: New Puppy ESA
« Last post by swimmergirl247 on Yesterday at 06:32:41 PM »
please please listen, if you want your pup to enjoy flying this I'd say would give you a 90% chance of ruining this. 5 months is right during a fear stage, what if you hit stressful turbluance? agian what if somebody is creaming, what if a baby is crying? what if he pee's on the plane our of fear? an you will to risk that please either don't take him or drive. really either way will be inconvience but if you drive you can practice tuck, you can practice this stuff along the way, you can stop and let him run if ned be, you can make it a great exposure take breaks at resturants and let him met people, ask if you can bring you pup into a gas station, spend a night in ahotel, all things he should learn to be exposed to but would be much more age approate. again next year or even this summer consider it, but he won't be ready for this and it could be extremely negative tramatizing, and what happens if he or she can't fly because of this. your also not flying during a low time (which I would also suggest for your first trip. another reason to not take him.

if you have already paid for your ticket then get a refund, and put that to having a fun drive, remember this isn't for forever, it's just this one or two times. 
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Emotional Support Animals (publicly viewable board) / Re: New Puppy ESA
« Last post by ccunnin3 on Yesterday at 04:47:58 PM »
Don't do it. It isn't about "making it a positive exlerience for him." It is about "can a 5 month old puppy behave appropriately in such a stressful environment?" Can your dog hold his bladder under stress? Can your dog (at least mostly) ignore other dogs. Can yoir dog walk on a leash in a crowd? Can your dog hold a 2 hour downstay? Does your dog vocalize? If your flight get delayed, will your dog be able to handle it? Will your dog be invisible to other people on your flight? Will your dog remain calm if you get upset?

I've never met such a young puppy that could reliably do these things (though I have met many handlers who tried).
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