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For me even a long life span would not be nearly enough to counter the one billion issues I would have with a horse. No way, no how, no thank you. Can you even imagine walking into a mall with a horse? You may as well reincarnate as a literally flame that attracts moths.  :unsure: kudos to the people who can handle all that.

Are they really that common? They make it seem like it's a thing when I don't think it's a very big thing. I only know of a small handful I've seen in news and like 1 I've seen on youtube. I doubt it's very common to have an assistance horse.
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They're about the same size as a large dog, but not nearly as flexible.  And they aren't as smart or biddable as dogs.  I've trained both species.  They produce a lot more fecal waste because their diet is much higher in fiber.  They also need to eat more frequently than dogs do.

Circumstances are they must be house trained and evaluated on a case-by-case basis about whether it is reasonable to accommodate them based on their size and whether their physical presence is likely to cause damage.  For example, hooves are much harder on wood floors than paws are.  With dogs it is automatically assumed that it will be reasonable to accommodate them just about anywhere the public may go without special clothing.

(9) Miniature horses. (i) A public accommodation shall make reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures to permit the use of a miniature horse by an individual with a disability if the miniature horse has been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of the individual with a disability.

(ii) Assessment factors. In determining whether reasonable modifications in policies, practices, or procedures can be made to allow a miniature horse into a specific facility, a public accommodation shall consider—

(A) The type, size, and weight of the miniature horse and whether the facility can accommodate these features;

(B) Whether the handler has sufficient control of the miniature horse;

(C) Whether the miniature horse is housebroken; and

(D) Whether the miniature horse's presence in a specific facility compromises legitimate safety requirements that are necessary for safe operation.

(iii) Other requirements. Sections 36.302(c)(3) through (c)(8 ), which apply to service animals, shall also apply to miniature horses.
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I know that there are positives to having a miniature horse. For example their intelligence or long life-span, or there disinterest in human food. But that being said, I still don't understand why you would opt for a horse over a dog! I mean, they're so big! Even the smallest of miniature horses wouldn't be able to tuck under a plane seat. It would be difficult even put them under tables at some restaurants. And no way you could go hiking with a miniature horse! And then the public attention like you guys are saying, it would be a nightmare! I get it that miniature horses as guide animals are possible, but it just seems so labor intensive to me!
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In the News (publicly viewable board) / Re: Can Dogs Predict Seizures?
« Last post by RedSonia29 on Yesterday at 10:12:55 PM »
None of my three seizure alert dogs exhibited stress over it.

It doesn't seem to bother my new SDiT either....
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In the News (publicly viewable board) / Re: Can Dogs Predict Seizures?
« Last post by Kirsten on Yesterday at 10:07:52 PM »
None of my three seizure alert dogs exhibited stress over it.
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In the News (publicly viewable board) / Re: Can Dogs Predict Seizures?
« Last post by RedSonia29 on Yesterday at 10:00:08 PM »
It's worrying to me that the dog becomes anxious from detecting the boy's seizures and requires time alone to calm down.

This isn't that uncommon. My previous service dog, Clive, needed resolution of a low or high blood sugar before he would relax. For him, resolution involved watching me eat or take insulin and sufficient time for my blood sugars to normalize, then get a treat when it was all said and done. Usually about 15 minutes or so. It's basically like decompressing after a stressful event.
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I think it's just that a business should try to accommodate them if possible, but they aren't required to.
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In the News (publicly viewable board) / Re: Can Dogs Predict Seizures?
« Last post by Ariel on Yesterday at 08:21:46 PM »
I wasn't able to do a super thorough read of this but it seemed to be a well written article. I appreciate that the article touched on there not being conclusive evidence for the ability to train seizure alert. It's worrying to me that the dog becomes anxious from detecting the boy's seizures and requires time alone to calm down.
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I know they're allowed "in certain circumstances." What circumstances are those, exactly?
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I still do not understand how people can deal with the amount of attention you have to be getting in public by using a horse. Just reading about it makes me want to hide. It must be a million times worse than having a dog. Cool for those it works for, I just can't imagine...i would be crawling up the walls daily.
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