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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Food With Rice
« Last post by BillBRNC on Today at 07:58:28 AM »
I appreciate the responses, as the responses show that there isn't a hard and fast rule, other than what seems best for a particular dog. I'll probably just feed my dog whatever the program has been feeding him, because he seems really healthy to me. I just thought there was a hard and fast rule about avoiding grain, and the only thing I could think of is the carbs. Me, I eat a lot of carbs, but then I'm old school, plain and simple when it comes to eating.
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Food With Rice
« Last post by SalukiLover on Today at 04:28:58 AM »
Some dogs do better on grain-free kibble. Some dogs do better on raw food. Some do better on kibble with grain. Some do better on wet dog food. Some are only fed home-made food and claim it's the best. It's pretty individual. The idea is to choose the food that is healthiest for your dog, and doesn't cause food allergies, diarrhea, spitting up, or whatever.

This.

Each dog is an individual -- just like people.  My dog cannot digest rice, and throws it up.  He needs to be entirely grain free to stay healthy.

Also, some dogs' needs change at different stages of their life.  My parents have a dog who could eat rice up until the age of about 10 or so -- and then he needed to be switched to a grain free formula.  He's doing much better now.  :smile:
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Food With Rice
« Last post by Roxie on Today at 12:37:40 AM »
The animals put into dog food are fed GMOs.... would that not be in the meat, organs, bones in the animals?
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Food With Rice
« Last post by Candy3 on Today at 12:14:53 AM »
Karma Organic Dog Food is extinct now, but that was the very best for my dog.
Grain-free dog foods gave him the runs. I ended up having to add rice to a couple of feedings until I could get a better food for him.
Allergies and concerns over GMOs and pesticides in grains are a main concern to many who choose to feed their dogs a grain-free diet.

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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Food With Rice
« Last post by Roxie on Yesterday at 11:42:03 PM »
Carbohydrates are important for brain health (I think??? Like a sugar??) and energy source for dogs.

Rice is easy to digest. I went ahead and looked at dogs and carbs and read this:  http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+1659&aid=655

I feed 4- Health Lamb and Rice as it is affordable, has the appropriate amount of protein and fat. I've also fed their grain fee product, too. When I've had sick dogs and puppies, I make a slurry of white rice and Science Diet canned from the DVM. I've also made a rice based get-diarrhea- fast slurry (with bacon grease) when my Terv ingested double chocolate fudge cake mix and was at risk for theobromine toxicity. (both slurries DVM ordered and guided)
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Food With Rice
« Last post by Candy3 on Yesterday at 09:39:52 PM »
Some dogs do better on grain-free kibble. Some dogs do better on raw food. Some do better on kibble with grain. Some do better on wet dog food. Some are only fed home-made food and claim it's the best. It's pretty individual. The idea is to choose the food that is healthiest for your dog, and doesn't cause food allergies, diarrhea, spitting up, or whatever.
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Food With Rice
« Last post by BillBRNC on Yesterday at 07:45:19 PM »
The message I've gotten from all the reading I've done is that dry food without any grain is the better choice all the time. I have read a few articles that say rice is a good addition. I don't see how carbohydrates can help a dog, other than to gain weight. What is the wisdom of the folks here. Thanks.
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It's not about being uneffected but not getting drawn in. If the animal feels stress or distress when the human is upset this is unhealthy for the animal. Sympathy, not empathy.

Healthiest response to handler distress? An attempt to initiate play such as offering of a toy. Calming signals not appeasement behavior. An awful lot of people mistake appeasement (a type of stress) for comforting or affection.
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Dog Attacks!
« Last post by Kirsten on Yesterday at 06:45:45 PM »
Service dogs are a target of dog attacks because they look "wrong." They wear gear which makes them look suspicious to un- or under-socialized dogs. That gear can also affect how the SD moves. A dog pulling in harness, for example, lowers his head and leans forward which is similar to an aggressive posture.
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Health & Maintenance (publicly viewable board) / Re: Dog Attacks!
« Last post by ZombieFodder on Yesterday at 03:39:00 PM »
Anywhere dogs are common. I had a lot of problems when walking my Lab in my own neighborhood, enough that I stopped walking him. He was bitten by a Chocolate Lab (my neighbor's), a Boxer that escaped a garage, a white husky type dog and we got tangled in a park when people let their dogs off leash and they chased us and got wrapped up in my chair and the dog.

My other neighbor had a pitbull that KILLED dogs and that was when I decided to stop walking the dogs. PetSmart type stores can also be an issue.

I think some of the time they were just dogs that bit and the rest of the time it was because my dog was unusual and pulling a wheelchair. A lot of dogs seemed agitated by it. Plus I meet a lot of wheel aggressive dogs anyway, but I noticed dogs become agitated by the dog pulling.

Depending on where you live it can be more of an issue. I've lived in some nastier areas that commonly had problems with pitbulls and vicious type dogs as well as just off leash strays in general. In other areas people tend to use leashes and own more docile type breeds of dogs.

It was a common enough problem for me I looked into a weapon of some sort. A baton or stun gun or spray. I carried spray around for a long time, never used it. Once I stopped taking the dog to parks and stopped walking in the neighborhoods the problem seemed to get a lot better. Meeting dogs in stores and other areas dogs are not allowed was more rare and I don't remember ever having an issue. It was usually neighborhoods and parks that were the big problems.
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