Recent Posts

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1
I think it's good that he's really thinking things through.  And if things change in the future, the option of a service dog will still be there.
2
And that's the way it is.  Sometimes it's a good solution, and sometimes the downside outweighs the benefits.  It's all very individual.  I'm really glad to see you thinking it through so carefully and making an informed decision.  It's so sad when people get blindsided by things they didn't know or expect after spending so much time and money to get a service dog and building so much hope into something that doesn't turn out as they expected.

He can always change his mind later on if circumstances change or he just figures the balance has shifted enough that he's better off with one than without one.

I hope you stick around anyway or at least check in from time to time.  Sometimes it's nice to talk to other people with similar disabilities and we do discuss other things besides service dogs, such as alternate ways to approach specific issues so there could still be things we could learn from him and his experiences and vice versa, plus it's just nice to meet people and make friends.
3
Basically, training the team already in place to do one more thing so they don't have to hire someone to specifically handle the dog.

It sounds like the school welcomes the dog, as long as it is being cared for by a handler not related to the school. The parents don't see the need to hire someone extra just to handle the dog and want to use the staff already caring for her daughter.

At least that is how I'm reading it.

No, I think you're right! 
4
If I'm understanding it correctly, the school doesn't want it's staff handling the dog for liability and/or other reasons. Without a person to handle the dog, the dog can't be controlled because the child can not do it on her own. So this forces the parents of the child to hire their own dog handler for their child. They want to train the current staff that is already taking care of the child (aide, nurse, teacher, etc.) to handle the dog as well instead of adding one more person to the team and paying for it out of pocket (the staff already there is paid by the school, I assume).

Basically, training the team already in place to do one more thing so they don't have to hire someone to specifically handle the dog.

It sounds like the school welcomes the dog, as long as it is being cared for by a handler not related to the school. The parents don't see the need to hire someone extra just to handle the dog and want to use the staff already caring for her daughter.

At least that is how I'm reading it.
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I don't quite understand anything the article says.
6
They didn't actually take the dog away but for quarantine because the dog bit someone breaking skin so far as I can figure.  In my area, rabies quarantine is for 10 days, which I think is pretty much standard.  The article talks a lot about it being a nice dog, but nice dogs can still spread rabies, so that has nothing really to do with it.  It says she'll have to pay for the dog's boarding during quarantine, which is also standard.  I'd suggest she pass the hat to those who are saying it's a nice dog and get some help paying the bill so she can get him home as soon as possible.

In my own city, if the dog has a current rabies vaccination and the person bitten is agreeable, the dog can be quarantined in the owner's home.  Alternatively, even if the dog does not have a current rabies vaccination, arrangements can be made for the dog to be quarantined at the owner's vet instead of at the city pound.  So even if we each have a nice dog unlikely to bite unprovoked, it might be a good idea to find out what our own local regulations are and be prepared in case something like this happens to one of us. 
7
We were talking this afternoon about the travel/pet sitter option for court days and realized that the SD wouldn't go along with DH snowboarding, which he plans to do often this winter. I think he is leaning away from getting a SD. Having a SD is supposed to make life better/easier/manageable, but it would also be a beacon, highlighting as DH says, another way he is broken. He doesn't want to be known as "the attorney with the SD." The downsides of a SD, at this time, don't balance out the benefits for DH.

Thanks again for all of your input and presenting all sides.
8
http://www.keyt.com/news/service-dog-for-military-homeless-veteran-quarantined/29266718

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. -

A homeless military veteran is asking for help after she says animal control officers took her service dog away.
9
I found this explanation on eviction notices: It could be a 3 day Waste, Nuisance or illegal activity notice or a Pay or Vacate notice. But this is for Washington state, other states can vary I guess. The 3 day illegal activity is meant for serious stuff. Like they want you and your meth lab out. They are kind of like a warning though and don't mean you have to move out in 3 days. Just shape up or be prepared to be forced to ship out. Exceptr the illegal activity sounds like they can get you out faster, hopefully.

http://www.tenantsunion.org/en/rights/eviction-process

I agree it sounds like there is more to the story. Especially if pets are allowed. Eviction and a lawsuit is pretty harsh to go to right away. I would think there is some type of history or something is not being done like paying a pet fee or barking or something.

Maybe there will be more news at some point.

10
There will be a LOT Of attention in public with a service dog.  It is very rare I go anywhere with my dog without at least one person asking me a question, pointing and staring, trying to pet my dog without asking, or doing something like barking or howling at my dog.  A couple weeks ago I went grocery shopping and not one person did anything to disturb me the whole trip and it was very unusual.  So unusual I still remember it.

Sometimes the questions are just something like "are you training him for a blind person?"  Other times they are more  person like "What's wrong with you?  You don't look disabled."  And some people are very persistent and keep asking questions even if I tell them I don't care to discuss it with them.

At some point, all service dog handlers will probably have an access dispute, as well.  Someone will try to tell you that you can't bring your dog someplace you are allowed to bring them.  Sometimes all it takes is telling them "The Americans with Disabilities Act says I can bring my dog in here."  Sometimes they will get nasty and yell or be really rude.

I think it is important to consider how that kind of attention in public will affect you.
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