Service Dog Central Community

Training => Book and Video Reviews (publicly viewable board) => Topic started by: Moonsong on November 09, 2017, 04:13:40 PM

Title: Thoughts on this video?
Post by: Moonsong on November 09, 2017, 04:13:40 PM
This YouTube video just popped up in my suggestions, and the guy was talking about bite inhibition techniques that I haven't heard of before. Thoughts?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUhjepUxnUU
Title: Re: Thoughts on this video?
Post by: Solace on November 09, 2017, 07:33:35 PM
The only thing I could think when he was trying to irritate his dog is that I started proofing Solomon against that at 8 weeks.  I played with his ears and mouth and feet so that, if someone comes along when we're out in public and does something stupid like that, he won't react.  How does that guy cut his dog's nails if he can't touch his feet?
Title: Re: Thoughts on this video?
Post by: Ariel on November 09, 2017, 07:55:32 PM
What a goddamn passionately loving idiot. This is how good dogs end up dead. Dogs stop offering warning signs that they're uncomfortable if a bite gets the person to quit. The more a dog practices a bite, the more a dog is likely to bite. Also the more severe a dog is likely to bite. This is a horrible idea, this "trainer" is really off his rocker and needs to find a different hobby that doesn't involve live animals.
Title: Re: Thoughts on this video?
Post by: OlgatheGSD on November 09, 2017, 08:36:51 PM
I was going to glance over this but Ariel's comment got me to watch it. First off, that dude repeats himself more than I do when I talk and that's saying something. Second, what on earth did I just watch!?! How does he clip his dog's nails?! Why is he praising his dog for showing teeth over touching his paws?!?!?!? Also letting a dog bite and retreat is just like teaching a toddler that giving in after they throw a tantrum gets them what they want so they forego asking for something first and dive right into the tantrum.

Olga came to me with an ear infection and since she was a bit of a bully, she bit when they put the meds in her ear and her infection never got better because she would wiggle and bite and they would give up. 3 days with me and she learned real stinking quick bite or no bite, she's still getting goop in her ear. Now she doesn't fight at all and I get in there with a rag to get the gunk out on a weekly basis. Bite inhibition is teaching dogs biting doesn't get them what they want.
Title: Re: Thoughts on this video?
Post by: Moonsong on November 09, 2017, 08:44:49 PM
Also letting a dog bite and retreat is just like teaching a toddler that giving in after they throw a tantrum gets them what they want so they forego asking for something first and dive right into the tantrum.

Ugh, I actually JUST saw that this morning at the Minute Clinic. Little girl actually ran away from her mom because she wanted candy or something from the front of the store (pharmacy and MC are in the back), face red, crying, the works. The mom catches up to her where she's already grabbed candy at the front desk, promptly buys the kid candy, and then drags her back towards the pharmacy, the little girl now grinning ear to ear. It was so frustrating to watch.

I agree that the rest of the video was total stupidity. I watched him encouraging his dog to bite and literally wondered why he hadn't desensitized paw touching in the first place? I was wondering about his theories on bite inhibition, though, if there's any truth to the idea of teaching a dog to understand their jaw strength. I was pretty freaking skeptical, but at the same time I'd truly never heard of that before, so that's why I thought I'd post and ask.
Title: Re: Thoughts on this video?
Post by: OlgatheGSD on November 09, 2017, 08:47:42 PM
Dogs learn bite strength through play first with mom, and then with their siblings. Mom will tolerate so much biting and then give a clear "TOO HARD" and put the pup in time out or get up and ignore the puppy. Puppies together will tend to yelp really loud and they will stop playing and nurse each other. You're also supposed to do it during play, and your dog SHOULD let go when you experience pain.