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Author Topic: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome  (Read 1136 times)

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Offline responsiblek9

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Service dog a calming presence for entire family
Chancer trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
http://www.ajc.com/news/north-fulton/service-dog-a-calming-188966.html
By Helena Oliviero



The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Eleven-year-old Morasha Winokur never knows what to expect from her brother, Iyal, when riding the school bus home together.

 
 Iyal Winokur, 11, hangs out with his service dog Chancer at his Roswell home. Iyal has fetal alcohol syndrome and can have tantrums. Chancer helps to calm him.
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Offline Roxie

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2009, 03:20:38 AM »
Cool!   But itis an ESA not an SD.

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Offline Keldrena

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2009, 06:49:37 AM »
I like this a lot. I was so happy to see that the dog doesn't go to school with the child and that if the child was lashing out the mom removed the dog.

Offline Shidash

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2009, 07:06:58 AM »
This seems like a good situation. A skilled companion dog was certainly the right choice. I am a bit shocked that the dog came from 4 paws though, most of the time those dogs should be ESAs or skilled companion dogs but end up in public. Perhaps the difference in this situation lies in the family.

Offline bj2circeleb

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2009, 09:18:46 PM »
The tasks are not tasks that I feel would hold up in court, and I do feel it is an ESA. I am impressed that the dog does not go to school and that the mother moves the dog out of the way if he gets too out of control, which is exactly as it should be. Just because the dog does not go to school, does not mean the dog is never in public places, but to me it would mean that the parents have accepted that they are the ultimate handlers and they will not have the dog in public unless they are there to handle the dog. I really do not care what a dog has been trained to do for tasks, although I do acknowledge the law does. But what I do and what I think most people care about is that any dog in public places has been trained to a high level and that the community can expect from any of these dogs that they will be in the hands of competent adults able to take on full care of the dog and that the dogs will behave to a high level the way the community has come to expect of guide dogs over the last century. Guide dogs set the standard and gave the community cofidence that it was OK for dogs to be in some places we would not normally have them. If other people want those same rights they need to ensure that their dogs can also meet those standards. Whether the dog helps or not is irrelevant to me and I think to many people in the community, but what we do want is that these dogs be of a high standard of public access skills and that they are in the hands of competent adutls and not left to work out for themselves what they should and should not be doing. If I was a parent of one of these children I doubt having a dog in public would really help me that much as I would have to control the dog and the child, but as long as the parent takes on the full care and control of the dog I really don't care if the dogs are in public or not, but do not expect teachers to babysit kids. I am impressed that this mother seems to have got this message, as the program that dog is from certainly has not!!

Offline Sunkala Joy van Veen

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2009, 12:00:29 AM »
They are wrong that this dog is the first to be selected and trained for a child with FAS.  I trained a lab as a companion for a child with FAS.  The child's father became my second husband.  She was much more disabled than Ilya sounds.  When I came into the picture, she was 6 yrs old.  She could not feed herself, dress herself, turn a doorknob, or speak coherently.  She had only one consonant, "D" and only at the beginning of words; and two vowels, short "a", and long "e".  She stood, or flopped, and screamed if she wanted something.

First I had to convince her father to let her take speech therapy, and get her into a program that would accept someone who had no hearing problem.  In the meantime I worked on her basic skills, like wiping herself when she went to the bathroom; opening a door; feed herself; and putting on velcro strap shoes.  Without at least this much, and some speech improvement; she couldn't attend kindergarten.  It was frustrating until I discovered she learned neither by visual nor audio means, but tactiley.  You had to physically move her body, hands, whatever; through the action again and again before she could mimic it.  Her speech improved.  One day she said an approximation on her own name.

By third grade she had learned to count to ten.  Then I got her into a new program that had two teachers, four teachers aides, and eight students of various ages.  This was also when I got her a dog.  The summer preceding I had workedwith her on her terror of dogs.  When she was confident enough I got her a lab cross.  I trained the dog to do the same sorts of things the dog in the article did.  By the end of that school year she had managed to read an entire sentence of several words.  And her speech improved when I told her she needed to give clear commends to her dog.  Eventually the average person could understand her if they took the time to concentrate.  She eventually joined 4-H with the dog.  Her walking was never smooth but lurched, but the dog knew how to avoid being stepped on, and the attempt to not step on the dog made her work harder at physical therapy.

I never left her unattended with the dog, though sometimes she didn't know it.  She never once blew up at her dog.  And no, the dog went only places pets were allowed!
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Offline bj2circeleb

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #6 on: November 10, 2009, 02:21:19 AM »
Joy, what you did is what should be done with all disabled children. Here in Australia very few programs place dogs with children as service dogs, but all of them do place in home companion dogs that are trained to help the child. All of the guide dog schools, bar one, not worth knowing, have since the first breeding programs in the 1960's been handing out the advanced failures to people with disabilities as pets and they continue to do so to this day with much success. They do in most cases give preference to children and adolescents who are blind, but they do give them to anyone who could benefit from a well trained dog, really could not train a dog themselves, and will have someone home at least part time and the dog will be living inside the house. They do extensive home visits for all of these people, as well as applications and the like. The stories that come from this part of the program is brillant and it is a shame that more parents cannot see the benefit of such things. Parents of autistic children here do now fall into two distinct groups, those who feel that these sorts of dogs are the best and most suitable and those who insist on the new tether dogs!!! I admire you for all you did for that child. It's a lovely story!!

Offline Sunkala Joy van Veen

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Re: Service dog trained to deal with child who has fetal alcohol syndrome
« Reply #7 on: November 10, 2009, 05:02:20 PM »
Unfortunately, conflict between her father and me led to my separation from her life before she started 5th grade.  He dragged his feet every step of the way with her.  If he could of had his way, she would have beenhidden away at home and never acknowledged to exist.  He didn't want her to go to speech therapy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, or the new "One Room Schoolhouse" program, with all the teachers and aides for the kids with severe learning disorders.

I have no idea how she did after my leaving, but I heard he took her out of all programs except straight school, wouldn't take her to 4-H, and got rid of the dog.  He expected her younger sister to spend all her time with her and see to her care.
kin Sunkaha Hkaha Olowan (Sunkala)
"Song of the Wolf"

This former member was banned for misrepresentation and targeting members for scams.  See details here:  http://servicedogcentral.org/forum/index.php/topic,7320.msg48158.html#msg48158

 


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